Applications Services Blog
Get the latest thought leadership and information about the role of Applications Services in an increasingly interconnected world at the HP Blog Hub.

From Oslo to London - Using HP's Enterprise Cloud Services

seadrill.JPGDay 2 at HP Discover provided a lot of new insights. During Mike Nefkens keynote, he provided an interesting case study featuring Seadrill.  See this ComputerWeekly.com article for more information.

 

Not only did HP move the whole of Seadrill's IT infrastructure and applications to London, but it also moved it onto a new platform: HP's Virtual Private Cloud. This offering that is available in more than 20 data centers around the world is an enterprise-grade, desaster-recovery-enabled cloud data center, which allows customers to run their enterprise applications in a secure and agile environment.

 

All applications at Seadrill had to be fully virtualised under a private cloud infrastructure, but it had several legacy applications which couldn't. In order to accomodate those, HP modified the standard cloud approach to include those legacy applications into the virtual private cloud.


User experience and data integrity are further topics that were discussed in today's workshops and presentations. HP has developed a series of services to improve the user experience of applications and has helped larger and smaller companies to create applications will be easily used by its employees, customers and partners. Irene Dudgeon provided very interesting insights in her presentation on the business value of a compelling user experience. Based on some research, it seems that about a quarter of the employees believe that their productivity suffers when using corporate applications on a tablet or mobile phone. This means that many companies don't give the same amount of care to applications for employees as they do for their customers. There is room for improvement and the services we offer in that area can help to speed up the process and provide compelling applications with a simple-to-use interface.

Regulation of data was the other big topic of the day. While everyone is talking about the cloud, many forget to think about the legal implications of moving data around in the cloud. Many countries and industries mandate how and where to store and manage data, and therefore the databases cannot be just moved into a public cloud outside of a given jurisdiction. So while it seems technically feasible to move the app into a public cloud, it might not be legally possible to do so. In order to avoid such a situation, HP offers a comprehensive assessment of applications to ensure that not only the technical aspects of cloud are reviewed, but also the business and legal requirements are taken into consideration before moving applications into the cloud.

 

Previous blogs by Danny Amor

Related Links

About the author

 

danielamor2.jpgDaniel Amor, EMEA Lead for Application Modernisation, Hewlett Packard Company

Daniel’s expertise includes Applications Modernisation (AMod), Cloud, Portals, Web Apps and the SOA domain. He has designed and led the implementation of large-scale, complex applications-related projects with clients throughout Europe. Daniel has more than 20 years of experience in the IT industry and is the author of six books and numerous articles in European and US-based publications on IT change. More information about Daniel can be found at http://www.hp.com/go/danielamor.

Comments
Steven Rubin(anon) | ‎12-12-2013 07:27 PM

"All applications at Seadrill had to be fully virtualised under a private cloud infrastructure, but it had several legacy applications which couldn't. In order to accomodate those, HP modified the standard cloud approach to include those legacy applications into the virtual private cloud."

 

Danny, what specifically did that entail? And would that fall under our overall AT2C approach (i.e. one could use this case for AT2C)?

 

thanks

 

Steve

dannyamor | ‎12-22-2013 05:16 PM
The standard cloud approach comes with standard SLAs, which had to be modified in order to accomodate the needs of the customer. HP was flexible on this, others were not as flexible.
Leave a Comment

We encourage you to share your comments on this post. Comments are moderated and will be reviewed
and posted as promptly as possible during regular business hours

To ensure your comment is published, be sure to follow the community guidelines.

Be sure to enter a unique name. You can't reuse a name that's already in use.
Be sure to enter a unique email address. You can't reuse an email address that's already in use.
Type the characters you see in the picture above.Type the words you hear.
Search
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Do you mean 
About the Author
Daniel Amor (EMEA, AMOD, Cloud, Portals, Web Apps and SOA domain expert): Daniel has designed, won, led and delivered large-scale, complex a...


Follow Us
The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation