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HP StoreOnce - podcast with Evaluator Group

CartoonCalvin100X100.JPG By Calvin Zito, aka @HPStorageGuy

 

I hope you're not feeling a StoreOnce overload because I have one more podcast to share with you.  The Evaluator Group took a look at HP StoreOnce and the D2D4312 Backup System with StoreOnce deduplication software.  In this podcast, I talked with John Webster from Evaluator Group about deduplication and what they observed in their testing of the D2D4312.   Here's the podcast:

 

 

I've got a lot of things to share over the coming days - It's great being at HP Technology Forum where I can talk to our experts or attend sessions and bring that back to you.  So stay tuned for more over the coming days. 

Comments
josephmartins | ‎07-09-2010 07:55 PM

I recently asked a few questions of others in dedupe/compression such as Storwize, Permabit, Ocarina. To be fair, I'll ask the same questions here Calvin. First a few points to provide some context.

 

Point 1: Most of today's compression and dedupe products rely on the equivalent of a "codec" (i.e. open or proprietary algorithms) to compress and decompress data. The primary difference is that compression algorithms are applied to individual files and dedupe algorithms are applied across many files.

 

Point 2: Some of today's compression/dedupe products implement this intelligence in a standlone "box" that is then wired into the network somewhere in or out of the data path. The box may be sold preconfigured with software from the vendor, or may consist of a customer-owned box with the vendor's software installed on it.  Either way it's a box.

 

Point 3: All data that is compressed or deduped by the box are now completely dependent on the box. That is to say, no piece of data that has been deduped/compressed in storage can be retrieved in its original form without the aid of the box.  Sure you can move the deduped segments around and across networks, but the segments cannot be reassembled into whole files without the box. Consequently a customer's data is at the mercy of the box.

 

Where would you say HP StoreOnce fits given what I described above? If a customer purchases StoreOnce and dedupes/compresses terabytes or petabytes of data, is that data then hostage to StoreOnce?  Can they get their data back, in it's original undeduplicated form, without it?

 

What if they want to switch to a competing product? Would they then have to process all of the data, potentially many terabytes or petabytes, back through StoreOnce on the way into another dedupe environment?

Stephen Johnson | ‎07-14-2010 11:31 PM

Hi Joseph,

 

We introduced our D2D StoreOnce products and strategy to the market in late June.  The characteristics that make HP’s StoreOnce unique in the market are a combination of three things. 

>  First, we use a very fine pitch variable size deduplication scheme that gives us a very effective deduplication engine.   

>  Second, using HP intellectual property we use what is referred to as “sparse indexing” that gives us great dedupe performance while reducing our overall  RAM requirements.  

>  Finally our deduplication technology is not hard-wired into the file system, hardware or interfaces which allows us to port this technology to different platforms.  

 

At the announcement we discussed HPs plan to port StoreOnce to run in three future platforms -  run on a virtual machine, run with HP Data Protector and run in a multi-node scale-out solution.  This will deliver deduplication performance from the desktop to the data center.  We are the only company that can deliver on this strategy.  This also gives us the ability to move data around the network between different StoreOnce devices without reinflating the data first.  However, the end device does need to support the StoreOnce deduplication technology.

 

Steve Johnson, HP StorageWorks Product Marketing

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25+ years experience around HP Storage. The go-to guy for news and views on all things storage..
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