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Displaying articles for: November 2010

How cloud computing can save babies’ lives in Kenya: HP teams up with President Clinton

We've written here before about the ability of information to save lives, and today we're happy to share a new example of how HP is putting those ideas into practice.

 

Today, HP and the Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI) announced a partnership to provide a new cloud-based system that will speed up the turnaround time for HIV test results for babies in Kenya, allowing for earlier treatment - and ultimately saving lives.

 

Under the current system, results of HIV tests are delivered on paper by courier. By taking advantage of IT – including HP datacenters, new database software, real-time analytics and SMS-connected printers – the system will reduce the turnaround time dramatically. Results will be available online and delivered to healthcare workers via SMS-enabled printers in just one to two days vs. the three months it can take today in rural areas of Kenya.

 

How does it work?

HP collaborated with CHAI to design a system that uses cloud computing to improve the tracking process and make test results available in real-time. HP is providing networking, storage, and servers to power five datacenters across Kenya, along with PCs and SMS-connected printers for healthcare workers

HP-CHAI-Infographic-Final.jpg

 

















 

(view the full size image)

 

With support from HP, students at Strathmore University in Nairobi developed a custom

database application used in the system.  At each lab, the processing of field information and capturing of testing data will become automated using this application, which generates a unique barcode for each sample of field data. As soon as the testing machine provides results, they are made available online and sent to healthcare workers via GSM/SMS printers in the field, and subsequently communicated to patients.

 

How could this save lives?

 In Kenya, approximately one out of every ten pregnant women is HIV positive. That means that of the 1.3 million children born in Kenya each year, more than 120,000 have HIV-positive mothers. Without intervention, there is up to a 45 percent chance that an infant born to a mother with HIV will become infected.

 

Due to the high rate of HIV in Kenya, all infants are required to be tested for the disease before they are six weeks old. However, the current testing procedure is paper-based and results, which are delivered by courier, can take up to three months to arrive in rural areas.  This delay reduces the efficacy of life-saving anti-retroviral treatment (ART), which needs to be started immediately following a diagnosis.  For example, an HIV-positive infant who does not receive ART has less than a 50 percent chance of living to see his or her second birthday.

 

What is the impact of this program?

The HP/CHAI project will:

– Expedite the delivery of test results from two to three months in rural areas to just one to two days

– Increase the number of children who are diagnosed with HIV and put on treatment from 45,000 in 2009 to 70,000 in 2011

– Increase the number of healthcare facilities that can access test result data from 1,500 to more than 3,000

– Connect data from four central labs to more than 20,000 healthcare workers via GSM/SMS

 

We expect that the HP/CHAI system for early infant HIV diagnosis will be replicated and scaled for use in other countries in 2011. In addition, it serves as a model for how IT could change the equation in the diagnosis and treatment of other diseases.

 

Quote from President Clinton:

“Technology and innovation are key to solving many of the most pressing challenges of our world, none of which are more urgent than a disease which takes the lives of 31 children every minute. I’m pleased HP’s technology and expertise will enable the partnership with CHAI to save the lives of more than 100,000 infants in Kenya each year, and in the process, demonstrate how the private sector can and should operate in the developing world.” 

Labels: healthcare

HP earnings: highlights from Q&A with financial analysts

HP senior management spent about an hour discussing the technology business and the company’s financial results this afternoon.

 

Here are a few highlights from CEO Léo Apotheker; the full official transcript is embedded below (and also available on our Investor Relations site).

 

CEO Léo Apotheker’s initial observations about HP:

[on customers] The great majority are telling me that they want to do more business with HP… But I am also hearing that we need to make it easier for customers to work with HP…

 

[on employees] “HP employees are a highly competitive group who want to win. They also want to be rewarded for their performance.  This is consistent across the globe.  I believe in a performance-driven culture, and our employees have been performing.  Therefore, I am pleased that we will be re-instituting salary increases in FY11 as part of our normal annual review process.  It’s well deserved…

 

[on technology] As Cathie described to you at the Securities Analyst Meeting in September, we have been increasing our investments in R&D.  In the fourth quarter, R&D was up more than revenue growth, both year over year and sequentially.  We should expect this trend to continue…And it is not simply about spending more on R&D.  Rather, it’s about driving more leverage from our existing portfolio and resources to create HP solutions.  It’s about adding more agility to our scale and accelerating our innovation cycles.

Labels: Financial

HP Renews Commitment to Palo Alto; Campus to be a ‘Greener’ Workplace

HP announced today that it is making a number of improvements to its global headquarters in a move aimed at revitalizing its campus in Palo Alto, CA. These updates include replacing older infrastructures, upgrading to newer and more efficient technology, and incorporating “green” solutions and sustainable materials to create better workspaces for our employees.

Update on HP CEO remarks regarding salary increases

During today’s conference call with investors, the HP executive team discussed the company’s results for the 2010 fiscal year, which included net revenue of $126 billion (up 10% from the preceding year).


CEO Léo Apotheker took the opportunity to affirm his belief in a pay-for-performance culture and - because employees have been a key driver of the company’s success - HP will be reinstituting salary increases as part of its normal annual review process in 2011.


To clarify some details behind his comments:


- HP is funding its performance-based bonus plan above last year’s levels (this program awards discretionary bonuses based on business and individual performance).

- The company has reinstated its 401(k) plan matching contribution as a fixed benefit rather than a discretionary one.

- The vast majority of HP employees who were affected by the base pay reductions during the economic downturn in 2009 will have their base pay reinstated.  Importantly, and in keeping with our pay-for-performance culture, employees must meet certain performance criteria to be eligible.

- HP is proposing a new employee share ownership program that is expected to enable employees to purchase HP shares at a five percent discount.


As Leo noted, the talent at HP is a highly competitive group that wants to win – and should be rewarded for their contributions to the company’s success.


To learn more about HP’s fourth quarter results:

HP Reports Fourth Quarter 2010 Results

Follow @hpnews on Twitter

Labels: statement

HP Reports Fourth Quarter 2010 Results

HP today announced financial results for its fourth fiscal quarter ended October 31, 2010, with net revenue of $33.3 billion, up 8% from the prior-year period including a slight negative currency impact of about one percentage point.

 

Read the full press release by clicking here; excerpts are below


***We will update this post throughout the day with quotes, transcripts, and presentations relating to HP’s third quarter earnings report.  Visit HP Investor Relations for more information or follow @hpnews on Twitter and Stocktwits.

Labels: Financial

HP Q4 2010: earnings quick reference guide for Monday, 11/22/10

HP (NYSE: HPQ) will present its third quarter earnings today, November 22, 2010, after the market closes.  We will post links to the news release, financials, and other information as it becomes available here at Data Central and on Twitter/Stocktwits at @hpnews.


You’ll also be able to follow the news on our investor relations website, the HP.com newsroom, Business Wire, and Facebook.


HP will also conduct a live audio webcast of its conference call to review its financial results for the fourth fiscal quarter at 2pm PT today: www.hp.com/investor/2010Q4webcast.


Related resources:

All HPQ SEC filings

HP Securities Analyst Meeting live blog (9/28/2010)

All executive presentations from 9/28/2010 Securities Analyst Meeting (includes detailed FY11 guidance [pdf])

HPQ 3Q10 earnings report (includes financials, press release, transcripts, etc)

Labels: Financial

Fragmentation in mobile OS market: Is it really a problem?

Lately one of the most popular topics for tech industry watchers to debate is the mobile operating system landscape.  Is it too fragmented?  Is there not enough competition?  Are there too many competitors?  Is this an issue for developers…or not?


(In fact there’s a whole Techmeme discussion from today led by Stephen Shankland’s CNET article “Angry Birds spotlights Android fragmentation”…more on that app and how it was ported to webOS below)


A new data point

The smartphone market is still in its early stages and it’s probably still too soon to have any hard and fast opinions on this matter.  But earlier this week, one of the leading investors in web and mobile startups, Fred Wilson, did contribute some meaningful new data and perspectives in a post titled “Fragmentation.”  Fred writes:


“Building web apps is not getting easier.  The fragmentation of operating systems and browsers is getting worse, not better.  Here’s a chart of the past thirty days of activity at AVC.com” [visitors to Fred’s blog]

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He goes on to note that no OS/browser combo has more than a 17% share, and that there are five with more than 10% share.  That means that visitors to his blog are using a very wide variety of tools to read his posts.  If you’ve ever developed even the simplest of websites, you know that debugging them so they work perfectly for all your users (whether they use Internet Explorer on a PC or iOS on a iPhone) is a difficult – and often frustrating – task.  The same dynamic holds true for ‘apps’.


Palm GM shares his perspective at Web 2.0

Jon Rubinstein touched on this dynamic at a high level in his keynote interview at the Web 2.0 Summit this week, saying “to really innovate, you have to do the whole user experience…hardware, software, cloud services, marketing, packaging” and so on:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

How hard does porting Angry Birds really need to be?

Today’s discussion regarding Angry Birds developers is a meaningful one, for all the history and reasons Shankland reports in his post (go read it).  A thriving app ecosystem is clearly a key strategic differentiator in the mobile market going forward.


The only thing left missing from the conversation?  How easy it was to port Angry Birds to webOS.


As Peter Vesterbacka (of Rovio, the company developing Angry Birds) noted after the webOS launch back in August:


"We made the decision [to port to webOS] because it was so easy."


"It just took us a couple of days to get the first port done and then we had it up and running…I would say [it was] trivial to get the port done.”


Check out the full thirty minute interview with Peter here (the comments above come at about 18:50).

 

Finally, if you're a developer in the New York City area, please do come out to webOS Developer Day today and tomorrow, November 20, for a fun filled day of HP webOS education and training.

Researchers at HP Labs Measure 100 Top Twitter Influencers in U.S. Congress

Just as President Obama’s 2008 campaign demonstrated the possibilities of social media in politics, the 2010 midterm elections saw a continued emphasis on online communications from those in Congress.


With the elections now passed, the Social Computing group at HP Labs applied a new algorithm to measure which members of Congress have the most influence on Twitter.


The difference between popularity and influence

After analyzing 22 million tweets, researchers at HP Labs (D. Romero, W. Galuba, S. Asur and B. A. Huberman) calculated a novel measure of influence and developed a corresponding algorithm that automatically identifies particularly influential users.


According to their research, it is important to separate the concept of “influence” from “popularity.” While a user on Twitter may have a large number of followers, his or her influence is more strongly associated with their engagement with the network, rather than the raw number of followers or retweets.


In short, influential users are those that are best at inspiring their followers to overcome their predisposition to remain passive.  You can learn more about the algorithm and other HP Labs social computing research by reading our announcement post here and watching the above video interview with Dr. Bernardo Huberman.

 

Analyzing members of Congress on Twitter

Using this algorithm, HP Labs was able to determine the 100 most influential members of Congress on Twitter. A few observations:


- 70 of the top 100 most influential members of Congress were Republicans.

- The average age of those on the list is 57, which is about the same as the average age of members of Congress and Senators.

- 13 of the top 100 are from Generation X, 69 from the Boomer generation and 18 from the Silent generation.

- Of the 86 that engaged in a recent campaign, 79 won, 7 lost and one remains outstanding.


Below is a list of the top 10 most influential members of Congress on Twitter.  The list shows their rank, the member’s name, their Twitter username, the number of followers, and their party and state (“R” for Republican, “D” for Democrat, and “I” for independent).

 

For the full list of 100 members, download the PDF.

 

And don't forget to follow HP on Twitter @hpnews and @hplabs!

 

*UPDATE 11/20/10: an earlier version of this report mistakenly omitted Eric Cantor (@gopwhip) from the list and ranked John McCain 7th.  Cantor should have been 7th on the list, with McCain ranked 8th.  The list below is now corrected.


1. Nancy Pelosi (@nancypelosi); D-CA; 15,964 followers

2. Paul Ryan (@reppaulryan); R-WI; 21,378 followers

3. Michele Bachmann (@michelebachmann); R-MN; 22,967 followers

4. Thomas Allen Coburn (@tomcoburn); R-OK; 17,631 followers

5. Bill Nelson (@senbillnelson); D-FL; 12,503 followers

6. John Boehner (@gopleader); R-OH; 48,604 followers

7. Eric Cantor (@gopwhip); R-VA; 20,384 followers

8. John McCain (@senjohnmccain); R-AZ; 1,718,288 followers

9. Joe Barton (@repjoebarton); R-TX; 4,091 followers

10. Sherrod Brown (@sensherrodbrown); D-OH; 4,947 followers

Labels: HP labs

HP selected to provide low-carbon technologies to UN climate change conference (COP16)

HP has been selected by the Mexican government to provide over $8 million of low-carbon IT solutions for the 2010 UN Climate Change Conference (COP16).  


The agreement includes solutions from a wide range of HP’s businesses, including notebook and desktop PCs, printers, data center and networking equipment, and supplies.  HP will also be supplying desktop systems to deliver high-definition video communications, transporting executives from the UN in Bonn, Germany to Cancun without a plane ride.   By using HP’s visual collaboration solutions that were announced today, we are truly minimizing travel-related emissions for COP16.


The COP16 IT team chose HP in part for its commitment to support environmental sustainability as a global business strategy and as a catalyst for technology innovation. HP has applied the collective influence of its products, operations, supply chain and partnerships to deliver low-carbon alternatives and solutions - optimizing resources, building intelligent infrastructure, and driving sustainable transformation for the 98 percent of businesses outside of the IT sector.


As a company that is committed to environmental sustainability, we’re honored to be able to play an important role in reducing the overall carbon footprint and emissions through the innovative use of technology at this year’s Climate Change Conference.

Labels: Sustainability

HP Labs fast-forwards to "Minority Report" and "The Matrix" to secure the mission-critical cloud

If you follow technology trends and have never heard of cloud computing, you may have spent your last two years living under a rock. What’s odd though is that if you ask a dozen people about the cloud, you’ll get a dozen definitions. That said, most of us can agree that any IT delivery model that brings greater agility, shorter projects, reduced admin overhead, lower risk of failure and reduced capital expenditure has strong potential to be A Good Thing.


At HP we strongly believe that cloud is the most important change to managing IT since client/server computing. But the challenge in managing through this change shouldn’t be understated; a new set of tools and skills will be needed. To help customers (and other researchers) understand some of this challenge, HP Labs Bristol has built the G-Cloud Theatre.

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



The G-Cloud Theatre is a room designed to demonstrate systems management in a mission-critical environment. The ‘G’ in G-Cloud stands for “government” and the demonstration in the theatre shows how a cloud hosting many virtual services could automatically resist even a sophisticated security attack intended to destabilise core data and programs (or generally cause mayhem).


The theatre demonstrates a futuristic vision of a console where human administrators could use a touch-sensitive interface to administrate services dynamically and in near real time. Think of it as HP’s nod to today’s computer games or movies like Minority Report and The Matrix. But also think of the G-Cloud demonstration as showing the way systems can be built that react to pre-written scripts or ‘playbooks’ in order to automate security and other management chores. This level of computer intelligence will be needed to rebuff the hackers and other bad guys of the future and will ensure that the Cloud is not some short-lived phenomenon confined to niche applications.


If this blog has piqued your interest, you can learn more about HP’s approach to cloud computing (and related HP Labs research) here and here.

Prith Banerjee, Rich Friedrich and Lueny Morell Discuss the Importance of Open Innovation

Today, Computer magazine published an industry perspective on innovation, featuring insight from HP Labs’ Prith Banerjee, Rich Friedrich and Lueny Morell.


HP Labs’ researchers are currently working on 24 projects spanning eight themes, each of which is defined as a “big bet,” meaning that it must advance the current state of technology and also have the potential to positively impact HP’s business and customers.  When conducting research within this overarching framework, HP Labs uses a portfolio approach:


- One third of all research projects are basic or exploratory, with possible applications five to 10 years in the future;
- One third is related to current products and services with possible applications five to 18 months in the future;
- The remaining third is applied in nature but not specifically product-related, with possible applications two to four years in the future. 

The team goes on to explain the need for open innovation:


“With the best technology talent still in short supply and far more mobile than ever, organizations must optimize their ability to attract and collaborate with top talent.  This demands a clear strategy, an overt high-level sponsorship, and an entrepreneurial culture that values experimentation and creativity.”


Open innovation is a fundamental component to HP Labs, whose innovation programs focus on three specific strategies:

1.       Innovation Research Program

2.       Open Cirrus Cloud Computing test bed

3.       Government and University Partnerships


(image above right: Prith Banerjee [right[ and Senior Fellow Stan Williams show off a new sensor design)

 

The benefits of an open innovation approach are numerous and wide-reaching.  Prith, Rich and Lueny highlight the impact among key stakeholders:


For companies, it represents a core strategy to augment and accelerate knowledge creation and technology transfer.  The concept allows universities to leverage corporate research and amplify the innovation process, helps to build capacity in emerging areas of science and technology, and aids in identifying skills and competencies needed in graduates to assist in renovating curricula.  For governments and nongovernmental organizations, an open innovation culture fosters entrepreneurship, catalyzing technology transfer and new business creation for sustaining and expanding knowledge-based economies.”


Subscribers to Computer magazine can access the full article here.

Today, Computer magazine published an industry perspective on innovation, featuring insight from HP Labs’ Prith Banerjee, Rich Friedrich and Lueny Morell.

 

HP Labs’ researchers are currently working on 24 projects spanning eight themes, each of which is defined as a “big bet,” meaning that it must advance the current state of technology and also have the potential to positively impact HP’s business and customers.  When conducting research within this overarching framework, HP Labs uses a portfolio approach:

 

·         One third of all research projects are basic or exploratory, with possible applications five to 10 years in the future;

·         One third is related to current products and services with possible applications five to 18 months in the future;

·         The remaining third is applied in nature but not specifically product-related, with possible applications two to four years in the future. 

 

The team goes on to explain the need for open innovation:

 

“With the best technology talent still in short supply and far more mobile than ever, organizations must optimize their ability to attract and collaborate with top talent.  This demands a clear strategy, an overt high-level sponsorship, and an entrepreneurial culture that values experimentation and creativity.”

 

Open innovation is a fundamental component to HP Labs, whose innovation programs focus on three specific strategies:

1.       Innovation Research Program

2.       Open Cirrus Cloud Computing test bed 

3.       Government and University Partnerships

 

The benefits of an open innovation approach are numerous and wide-reaching.  Prith, Rich and Lueny highlight the impact among key stakeholders:

 

For companies, it represents a core strategy to augment and accelerate knowledge creation and technology transfer.  The concept allows universities to leverage corporate research and amplify the innovation process, helps to build capacity in emerging areas of science and technology, and aids in identifying skills and competencies needed in graduates to assist in renovating curricula.  For governments and nongovernmental organizations, an open innovation culture fosters entrepreneurship, catalyzing technology transfer and new business creation for sustaining and expanding knowledge-based economies.”

 

Subscribers to Computer magazine can access the full article here.

Labels: HP labs

HP Enhancing Role in Medicare and Medicaid Support

Did you know that HP administers $95 billion in Medicare and Medicaid benefits every year?  HP also handles 35 percent of all Medicare and Medicaid claims in the United States, and processes 2.4 billion healthcare transactions annually (including 1 billion in healthcare claims).

 

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Rising healthcare costs and growing demands on government healthcare programs are straining government budgets. The challenge is to contain healthcare costs while assuring the highest level of quality of care.  Recognizing this, HP is focused on bringing enhancements throughout the healthcare industry to reduce costs while benefiting patient care.


For example, in October, HP was awarded $26 million by the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to improve the accuracy of Medicare payment data. These types of enhancements and modernizations can reduce administrative healthcare costs, allowing resources to be redirected to the provision of care.


To learn more about how HP is harnessing the power of IT to help save lives and improve efficiency, check out this post about a recent HP Labs talk.

How safe is healthcare?

On Wednesday, Jaap Suermondt of HP Labs delivered the opening keynote at the Future of Health Innovation conference at Stanford.  The event, organized by SDForum and Innovation Center Denmark, brought together innovators from California and Denmark – and the worlds of academia, business, government and foundations – to share best practices in innovating to improve healthcare. 


(Why Denmark, you might ask? The small country boasts impressive healthcare technology adoption, including one of the world’s most integrated patient data systems. Denmark has high patient and physician satisfaction rates and relatively low costs. In the U.S., over 17% of the GDP is spent on healthcare. In Denmark, it’s 10%.)


An few notable speakers included the head of medical planning at Stanford University Medical Center, the Chief Innovation & Technology Officer at Palo Alto Medical Foundation, representatives from Kaiser and Sutter Health, a designer from IDEO, and the Danish Minister of Interior and Health.


Echoing his recent remarks at the World Health Summit in Berlin, Jaap spoke about the state of safety and efficiency in healthcare. The facts about safety are pretty shocking:


- On average, 44,000 patients die every year in the U.S. from medical errors. That’s more than die from auto accidents.


- Patients have a one in ten chance of experiencing a medical error while in a hospital.

As anyone who has spent time in a waiting room recently knows first-hand, efficiency could stand some major improvements; the average doctor’s visit lasts eight minutes but takes an hour and a half all told.


Jaap spoke about how harnessing information with IT can help save lives and improve efficiency. You can hear some highlights in the video below:

 

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