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What’s causing your slow network speeds?

By Gladys Alegre-Kimura, Global Product Marketing Manager, HP Networking

 

Gladys Alegre KimuraYou know the feeling—you spend your out of office time on your home wireless network and everything you want to accomplish can be done on your array of mobile devices with no problems. But then later, when you’re back at work you encounter roadblock after roadblock using your mobile devices; either log-in issues, slow load times, or other complications. Now imagine this problem multiplied across all the employees in your organization. That’s a lot of potentially frustrated wireless users—so how do we make sure they enjoy the level of connection they’re used to and have come to expect in their daily lives?

 

Obviously one of the big differences between the home and office is, as we mentioned, the sheer number of devices the corporate network needs to handle. It’s easy for a small environment to handle 3 or 4 active devices at a given time. A large office park or campus is significantly different from that kind of environment—with numerous more device types connecting, which in turn makes for more complexity. But that doesn’t mean you have to throw up your hands and just accept poor performance. Network managers can rely on some techniques and best practices to keep wireless users happy. The following video examines some of these techniques and practices: 

 

 

Knowledge is the key to keeping your end users happy, knowledge of how they interact with your network, knowledge of where you may have blind spots institutionally, and also knowledge from data and analytics. As the video demonstrates, those areas of knowledge can be roughly boiled down to:

  • Visibility. You can’t fix what you can’t see. Visibility of the individual devices connecting to your network allows administrators to troubleshoot quickly.  And that quick response to trouble, sometimes before the user even knows there is a problem, is one way to keep those on your network happy;
  • Comprehensive monitoring and management—including tools to optimize your deployment strategy. Simply put, use tools to predict optimal wireless coverage for your physical infrastructure. Make sure that the banks of microwave ovens and the lead-lined wall of your cafeteria aren’t getting in the way of signal strength. Again, having knowledge and insight into what may be holding back your network is key; and
  • Performance Monitoring—in other words, intelligence gathering on how your wired and wireless infrastructure is performing and how device clients interact with it. Correlating data between all three entities allows you to discover errors or misconfigurations that lead to a poor wireless experience. 

wireless,speed,wlan

 

HP networking solutions can help you ensure that your users are able to avoid the poor wireless performance they've had to endure in other settings. With a comprehensive approach to your wired and wireless networks you can make sure your staff is productive and your IT staff is able to focus on keeping them that way.

 

For even more information about HP networking solutions and how to keep your end users happy, 

>> For more information about the HP Wireless LAN solutions visit www.hp.com/networking/wlan

 

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<< Previous Blog: Improve Wi-Fi experience while avoiding interference

Martine Velkeniers explains how RF interference affect your Wi-Fi speeds at work leading to lower satisfaction and performance. Read on to know how RF interferences can be detected, managed and mitigated.

>> Next Blog: Why a “Unified Network” saves you time and money

Dragana Beara talks about deploying a unified network solution designed for unified access, BYOD, security, and unified management and how it reduce TCO by 47%.

 

 

 

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