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HP Servers celebrates BIG NEWS at HP Discover that’s “out of this world”

Guest blog by Sharon Fisher, HP Servers

 

Attending HP Discover is a celebration in its own right.  Right?  You get to meet up with old friends, have an opportunity to make new ones, and experience all the excitement that only a company like HP can present during this 3-day technology immersion.  But at this year’s HP Discover, you will also have the opportunity to participate in an exclusive ribbon-cutting ceremony to celebrate big news from the HP Servers team.  

HPTF 2009: "What happens in Vegas doesn't have to stay in Vegas!!" Stay connected.

Traveling to the show? Share with us your experiences. Can't travel? Stay tuned to this web site for the latest info.


stay connected HPTF2009


At Tech Forum (June 16 - 18 in Las Vegas) HP will showcase its premier enterprise computing solutions. The event will feature daily keynote speakers, presentations and booth demos. If travel restrictions are preventing you to attend in person, you still have the opportunity participate. Via a dedicated website that includes a wide range of tools, HP will provide access to summary videos of selected keynote presentations and demos. See this year's choices of topics at the event & expo.


"What happens in Vegas doesn't have to stay in Vegas!!" Check www.hp.com/go/HPTF-buzz for all the info on the HP Tech Forum 2009 for servers, storage and software. Share with us what you are seeing and experiencing on Twitter, Facebook, Blogs, Slideshare, upload your photos to Flicker and videos to YouTube.


More blog info coming from the show including lists of the "top threes" from the event. Please also feel free to comment on the site www.hp.com/go/HPTF-buzz to help us give you the info you want. Likes, dislikes?

I received a new HPC Multi-core server today – documenting the configuration

 


One of the complexities in benchmarking applications is defining the server configuration adequately.  The purpose of a benchmark is to provide guidance - to demonstrate how to obtain a given performance from a specific application workload.  This guidance is not useful if the performance cannot be reproduced.  To make benchmark results reproducible, it is necessary to define the server configuration, specifying everything that can affect performance.  From a hardware point of view, this is not difficult - specify the model numbers of every component in each server, then specify the model numbers of the components in storage and networking components.  Some of this information is available on-line, such as processor model number.  Other information, such as model or speed of memory DIMMs, is usually not accessible on-line, but this data is important.  For example, some current x86 servers have an option of 667MHz or 800MHz DIMMs, and this choice can affect application performance considerably.


Identifying the software components can be difficult, since you need to know which components affect the performance of the workload.


And the most obscure configuration area is firmware - in some cases, versions of firmware have a big impact on workload performance.  It is rarely necessary to document the firmware version of the server, but it is a good idea to document firmware versions of networking components.


Next, it is important to know how the quantities of specific components affect performance.  Performance varies with the number of disks internal to the servers, the number controllers connecting the server to external disks, the number and topology of network switches, etc. 


One important variable is the number of memory DIMMs.  The number of DIMMs affects performance in two ways - the total amount of memory on the server, and the memory performance.  It is useful to run the workload using the maximum number of DIMMs, then repeat the benchmark using ½ as many DIMMs.  Memory is expensive, and it is very useful to know how the workload performance varies with memory configuration.

I received a new HPC Multi-core server today – Live from SC08

This week, I am attending the annual SC08 conference.  For 2 decades, the tradition in HPC is to announce and demonstrate new products at the SC conference, and there is a lot to absorb. 


For me, the event started with a 2-day HP user conference, attracting some of HP’s largest HPC customers.  It was a very full 2 days, with lectures on many subjects from customers, Intel, AMD, software development companies, and of course HP.  Even though I work here, I learned a lot about projects in other parts of the company.


At the SC08 show, I saw my 1st HP POD – portable optimized datacenter – a 40-foot-long shipping container on the outside, and a self-contained computer facility on the inside.  This excellently-designed mobile facility can contain 3500 servers or 12,000 disk drives, in standard 19” racks.  Just provide a flat location, power, chilled water, and a network cable, and you have a new computer room.


To make the week more interesting, AMD announced the new Opteron Shanghai processor – higher clock speed, bigger cache, faster Northbridge, and improved performance:smileytongue:ower ratio.


One of the good things about big companies is that they spawn startups.  This year, a startup company announced a new HPC architecture at SC08.  Nearly all the employees are my friends and previous HP co-workers.   Check out www.conveycomputer.com

 

 

I received a new HPC Multi-core server today – How to measure the power usage

Given that it is important to measure power usage and correlate it to application performance, how do you measure the power?


We use 2 different methods - one for rack-mounted servers and another for blade servers.  The rack-mounted servers do not provide power meters, so we bought a power meter.  We plug the server into the power meter, so we are measuring the total power used.  Then, with a simple PC interface, we allow the application user on the server to obtain continuous power data which is easy to correlate with the applications. 


This is easy for the users, but it requires planning and logistics and some work by our system managers, to connect the meter to the right server at the right time.


We often want to measure the power of a cluster running one HPC application in parallel, and it is usually sufficient to measure the power of any one server in the cluster running the application.


It is easier to measure power on an HP blade enclosure, since the enclosure contains power measurement capability and provides this data in a usable way.  The available data includes the total enclosure power and also the power used by each blade server and each fan in the enclosure.  We integrated this information with the Platform Computing LSF job scheduler.  Now, users of our blade servers submit their jobs via LSF and automatically receive their power usage data as part of the job.


Next week, I expect to post a message from the SC08 conference.

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About the Author(s)
  • I am part of the embedded software management team doing UEFI, Scripting tools (STK, PowerShell), etc
  • I am part of ISS Product Marketing, currently managing couple of dual processor ProLiant servers.
  • More than 25 years in the IT industry developing and managing marketing programs. Focused in emerging technologies like Virtualization, cloud and big data.
  • Delisa Johnson currently leads successful, corporate events for HP Servers and is established as the go-to person for business unit communications regarding launches, executive meetings, wins and business updates.
  • I work within EMEA ISS Central team and a launch manager for new products and general communications manager for EMEA ISS specific information.
  • Hello! I am a social media manager for servers, so my posts will be geared towards HP server-related news & info.
  • HP Servers, Converged Infrastructure, Converged Systems and ExpertOne
  • WW responsibility for development of ROI and TCO tools for the entire ISS portfolio. Technical expertise with a financial spin to help IT show the business value of their projects.
  • Luke Oda is a member of the HP's BCS Marketing team. With a primary focus on marketing programs that support HP's BCS portfolio. His interests include all things mission-critical and the continuing innovation that HP demonstrates across the globe.
  • I work in the HP Servers marketing group, managing a marketing team responsible for marketing solutions for enterprise customers who run mission-critical workloads and depend on HP to keep their business continuously running.
  • Global Marketing Manager with 15 years experience in the high-tech industry.
  • I’ll be blogging about the latest news and enhancements as it relates to HP Moonshot.
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