Teaching, Learning & Technology
Sharing best practices from faculty around the world who are using technology to transform teaching and learning.

“Where’s the Beef?” when it comes to your tech investments

Classrooms might look pretty bebeef-300x282.jpeging filled with all of this technology, but at the end of the day, parents, board of education members or your community is going to ask you “Where’s the Beef?” Just because your school has chosen to adopt one to one, doesn’t mean you’ll have much success. In fact, the majority of projects result in little to no meaningful results. 

Giving parents “peace of mind” for college-bound purchases

In most cases, parents don’t know what else they should include in their purchase to make sure their student has a safe and productive computing experience at college. peace_of_mind.jpgSo whether you’re looking for the ideal computer for yourself, or your school-bound family member, remember that the most important factor to consider isn’t just price. . When you’re shopping for your ideal computing device – whether a desktop, notebook or tablet, please take into account my list of four “must-haves” for every college bound student.

7 Survival Skills for Students - Tony Wagner Summarized in Tweets

Last week I attended the IFC/World Bank international conference on private education – and I’m still inspired by the keynote from Tony Wagner, Expert in Residence at Harvard’s Innovation Lab. His talk was a great launch to the conference theme, “Rethinking Education – Shaping the Future” …and a great reminder of what’s in store for today’s school-aged youth…

 


Mathematical Repesentations, Part 2

This blog contains the conclusion to the blog post Mathematical Representations and Technology, where we look at one possible role for technology-created mathematical repesentations in the teaching of mathematics.

Mathematical Representations and Technology

Mathematics education is unique in its reliance upon mathematical representations to facilitate mathematical discourse in the classroom. Technology can enhance (and limit) the set of representations available to both teachers and practitioners, as well as both enhancing and limiting their mathematical fidelity as representations. With the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (US) annual conference coming up next week in New Orleans, I wanted to take a moment to reflect on mathematical representations, maintain their role as distinct from the objects themselves, and examine the role of technology in the creation and manipulation of mathematical representations.

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About the Author(s)
  • A former K-12 district administrator and adjunct professor of communication, Elliott has won over 60 state and national awards in school public relations, is a past columnist for Electronic School, School Administrator and American School Boards Journal, and has been interviewed for many leading educational publications. Recently, Elliott helped developed models for personal learning, which in testing increased successful completion of algebra from 33% to 71% versus traditional classroom instruction. His work is featured by HP at www.hp.com/makeitmatter
  • I am part of the HP Calculator team, working on the HP Prime graphing calculator. I taught mathematics for 20 years and have extensive experience in the professional development of teachers of mathematics. My area of interest is mathematics education; specifically, how technology affects the teaching and learning of mathematics.
  • Jim Vanides is responsible for the vision, strategy, design, and implementation of education technology innovation initiatives. His focus is the effective use of technology to create powerful learning experiences that help students around the world succeed. He has been instrumental in launching over 1200 primary, secondary, and higher education projects in 41 countries, including the HP Catalyst Initiative - a 15-country network of 60+ education organizations exploring innovations in STEM(+) learning and teaching. In addition to his work at HP, Jim teaches an online course for Montana State University on the Science of Sound, a masters-level, conceptual physics course for teachers in grades 5 through 8. Jim’s past work at HP has included engineering design, engineering management, and program management in R&D, Manufacturing, and Business Development. He holds a BS in Engineering and a MA in Education, both from Stanford University.
  • Mike is a passionate education advocate dedicated to helping schools design, build and deliver solutions that solve the complex instructional challenges that face K12 leaders every day. Mike is interested in working with individuals and organizations that share the same level of commitment to improving Instructional outcomes with and through the use of technology
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