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Find out the potentially high cost of saving money. Attend this HP Discover 2014 session.

On paper, it might appear you can cut costs by using a third-party maintainer (TPM) or unauthorized support instead of support from HP or an HP Authorized provider. However, it’s important to understand the differences in resources and capabilities, and how you might end up paying more than you expect.

A Discover 2014 session titled “The real value of HP & HP authorized support. Comparing HP authorized support to unauthorized third party support,” outlines the risks associated with unauthorized support from a TPM. You’ll find out why you should be concerned with the quality of spare parts, the skill level of support engineers, and escalation capabilities. You’ll learn why you’re at risk when you don’t have access to HP’s proprietary Service Advisories, and how HP Intellectual Capital Management policies limit third-party access to firmware updates and patches.

This is a must-attend session for anyone who thinks that initial cost is what should determine the choice of a service provider.  It is a Discover Theater session and will be held on Tuesday, June 10 from 1:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.  More information is available here.

Could this happen to you?  
A major HP customer recently had a problem with firmware updates. They were aware of the importance of keeping their HP systems up to date, so they purchased software support from HP to get access to the latest software patches and updates. The HP agreement also included Proactive Select Credits that were used to get proactive assistance throughout the year from an HP Account Support Manager (ASM).  Both of these were excellent choices.

Unfortunately, their third choice wasn’t as wise. The customer listened to the “lower cost” claims of an unauthorized service provider and said “yes, please” instead of “no, thanks” to hardware support from the TPM. Everything seemed to be fine until a particular hardware failure occurred and the system failed to boot. The TPM tried many times over several days to resolve the issue.  During this time, the customer was experiencing costly downtime and finally decided that “lower cost” support was becoming way too expensive. They called HP who set up a Time and Materials agreement with them and dispatched HP engineers to their sites. Using proprietary diagnostic tools, the engineers determined that three cell boards (System Boards) needed to be replaced. An operating system restore would also be needed to complete the repair. After approximately six hours of work, the system was turned over to the customer.

This story is just one of many examples that show why it’s wise to say “no, thanks” to the money-savings claims of TPMs. The cost of saying “yes” is just too high.  

If you are interested in finding out more about why HP and HP Authorized support are better, check out these other Discover sessions:

•    DT3591 - Why people matter in the world of IT support
•    BB3749 - Get connected and get back to business
•    BB3743 - Mastering complexity in a cloud-based world with Datacenter Care     

If you haven’t yet registered for Discover, you can do so by clicking here.  You can also get complete information about the event at the HP Discover 2014 website.

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