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Keeping the older eggs delivering business value

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by John Flowers, WW Channels Marketing Manager, HP Technology Services

 

If you’ve been around the IT industry for a while, you can’t help but be staggered by the pace of innovation. Moore’s Law predicts semiconductor density will double every two years, and we computer manufacturers have been quick to apply those denser, faster chips to make smaller, faster, more energy-efficient computers. For most companies, this is driving server refresh programs every three to four years. But do you need to replace every server just because it’s fully depreciated?

 

Many applications benefit from upgrading to the latest, most powerful hardware and software, of course. And certainly new application rollouts should take advantage of the improved price-performance available in the newer systems. But the fact is, most IT shops have applications perking along on hardware that’s five or more years old, and there’s simply no business need to replace it. That hardware can still deliver the business value it was bought for. And since it’s paid for, you can spend your capital budget on those new business initiatives the CEO wants to pursue.

 

Mark Twain said, “Put all your eggs in one basket—and watch that basket!

That’s what businesses are Mark Twain.jpgdoing when we entrust our businesses processes and data to IT systems. And even though it’s older gear, the applications and data it supports are still vital to your business. While accountants may claim older hardware has little value, they’re only talking about the basket. The eggs—the data and services it enables—may be just as valuable to your business as they ever were. And, at the risk of compounding metaphors, failing to protect them properly is penny wise and pound foolish.

 

So older systems—whose original warranty and HP Care Pack services are expiring—still need the business protection offered by continuing service arrangements. The last thing you want is loss of data and loss of productivity caused by scrambling to restore systems whose service contracts you have let lapse.

 

We’ve been working to make it easier and more cost effective for our customers to continue needed service after the original warranties and Care Pack services expire. So we offer Post Warranty Care Packs you can purchase within the last 90 days before expiration of the warranty or in-place Care Pack, and up to 30 days after expiration. They are for one or two years, so you don’t have to buy service beyond the anticipated lifespan of the equipment. And they can provide a range of service levels that you can match to the business need. Post warranty Care Packs for Proliant servers, for example, offer 24x7 coverage with four-hour response as well as next-business-day support. And if you use HP Proactive Care, Post Warranty Care Packs can provide the same enhanced features like a local account support manager, firmware and patch analysis and updates, and an enhanced call experience.

 

For IT professionals charged with watching the business’s IT baskets, Post Warranty Care Packs help you keep older systems delivering the business value they were bought for, and at a planned and predictable cost.

 

Mark Twain was nothing if not practical. I think he would expect it.

 

 

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