The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

Data, the lifeblood of the enterprise

data lifeblood.jpgEven though object-oriented techniques and analytics have been around since the last century, today they are being applied and thought about in whole new ways. Technologies are enabling objects to interact with monitoring, analytics, and control systems over a diverse range of networks and on a plethora of devices. Computers are embedded in devices and rarely thought of as devices themselves, by most people.

 

This more connected and action-oriented approach will expand the reach and impact of information technology systems, impacting business value generation, applications expectations, and use cases where IT hasn’t really been focused effectively before.

 

One of the exciting aspects of this intelligent edge approach to the business use of IT is that the software will enable greater control of the physical world, not just the digital one. This means less latency and more efficient use of resources (including human attention). For many, this started in the consumer space, and is only now being embraced within business.

 

The importance of this information and its integration into the business means that the focus on security will need to increase, protecting the data as well as the control data streams. This flow will become like the blood flow of the human body, if it is interrupted or somehow contaminated – bad things happen.

 

With gamification techniques, this information flow can be used to adjust human behaviors as well as machines. How organizations think about and deal with data is already changing.

 

Everyone needs to get comfortable with:

  1. The data sets we’re working with today will look trivial within the relatively near future. Storage technology will continue to get larger and cheaper.
  2. We’ll keep the data longer and continue to generate new value from the data in use today. Data is a corporate asset and we need to treat it as such.
  3. Data scientists will be in high-demand and business schools will branch into this area in a big way, if they haven’t already.
  4. The conflict between real-time access to information and the security implications will continue to be a concern
  5. The use of cloud techniques will mean that organizations will need to start feeling comfortable with moving the computing to the data more often than the data to the computing. The pipes are big, but not that big.
  6. The diversity of devices used to access the information and the locations they are accessed from will continue to increase. BYOD is not about devices.
  7. Master data and metadata management are critical skills to get the most out of big data efforts. Even if they can’t be synchronized, they need to be understood.

 

We have the computing and bandwidth capabilities, it is just our imaginations on how to use it that limits us.

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About the Author
About the Author(s)
  • Steve Simske is an HP Fellow and Director in the Printing and Content Delivery Lab in Hewlett-Packard Labs, and is the Director and Chief Technologist for the HP Labs Security Printing and Imaging program.
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