The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

Dimensions of assessing an agile architecture?

measurement.pngI keep hearing that organizations have greater expectations from their IT organizations than are being delivered. Shadow IT is the response as the business-side of the enterprise decides to go-it-alone. Many times those investments are done in a relative vacuum when compared to the rest of the organization’s portfolio.

 

As businesses move to be more agile and make better informed decisions, the focus is on being flexible in a number of dimensions:

  • Location – where and when works takes place
  • Social – relationships with and between customers, partners, devices and employees
  • Secure – what, why and how much in good enough
  • Process – for the past, now and in the future
  • Insight – what is and will be happening, and why

In continuing to think along the lines of the post on agile architecture, it makes me wonder how an architecture can be measured along these lines in the dimensions of time and value. Even though the requirements for the architecture can’t be nailed down do the perspectives (like those listed) remain constant? Should we also build into our thinking how long we think the architecture element is viable? That can be a tough issue as evidenced by the continued contributions of mainframes, COBOL and other technologies that are pretty far along the ripe cycle.

 

I recently read a thought provoking article titled: Management in the Second Machine Age that made me wonder about the effects of automation on IT architects as well. If you can measure it, you are closer to being able to automate it.

Leave a Comment

We encourage you to share your comments on this post. Comments are moderated and will be reviewed
and posted as promptly as possible during regular business hours

To ensure your comment is published, be sure to follow the community guidelines.

Be sure to enter a unique name. You can't reuse a name that's already in use.
Be sure to enter a unique email address. You can't reuse an email address that's already in use.
Type the characters you see in the picture above.Type the words you hear.
Search
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Do you mean 
About the Author
Follow Us
The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation