The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

New Horizons for taking IT lessons into Aerospace

Next week, I am going to be part of a panel at the New Horizons Forum that is part of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) conference. The panel is going to be focused on: Information Technology – Spin-On Technology for Aeronautics and Space. Essentially leveraging efforts into Aeronautics and space.

 

I’ll have a few minutes to present where I’ll focus on the shift in how we will use people and computing in the future and talk through some examples. In many organizations have so much data coming in that there is no way that any organization can effectively consume it, using today’s techniques.

 

I’ll use a simple model to show how things are changing and where HP labs is focusing research. The model is that one datum is a point, 2 data are a line and three are a trend. 100 data points are a picture or pattern. When you can move beyond calculations at the bit level and actions in isolation, whole new levels of capability open up.

 

Today, we think about working with data primarily in isolation. We need to start thinking about storing massive amounts of data (using devices like memristors), computing on the patterns using different techniques (like Cog Ex Machina) and using whole new approaches to focus the attention of those who need to act upon the context described by the data (like automation and gamification).

 

A holistic shift in how we approach sensing will be needed:

sensing.png

When I think about the work done with HP and Shell to gather detailed seismic information for oil detection and production, it makes me wonder about possibilities of families of sensors gathering data for planetary exploration. It also makes me wonder about using crowd sourcing techniques to tease out meaning from the unique items that pattern matching on all that data can identify.

 

It should be an interesting panel, for the audience and the panelists.

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