The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

Update on skin-based sensing

skin sensor.jpgBack in 2011, I created a post about Sensors in Tattoos – taking wearables to a whole other level of monitoring.

 

Today I saw an update from the University of Illinois about a prototype for an Ultrathin “Diagnostic Skin” that allows for continuous patient monitoring.  This device sticks to the surface of the skin and can survive most normal stretching and pinching motions.

 

“The technology offers the potential for a wide range of diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities with little patient discomfort. For example, sensors can be incorporated that detect different metabolites of interest. Similarly, the heaters can be used to deliver heat therapy to specific body regions; actuators can be added that deliver an electrical stimulus or even a specific drug.”

 

The current investigation is tracking skin temperature, which can be used to track the onset of an illness…

 

Although not attached directly on the skin, this technology from Rice University attempts to detect malaria by sensing low levels of the malaria infe....

 

The new diagnostic technology uses a low-powered laser creating tiny vapor “nanobubbles” inside malaria-infected cells. The bursting bubbles have a unique acoustic signature that allows for an extremely sensitive diagnosis. The test requires no dyes or diagnostic chemicals, and there is no need to draw blood.

 

“A preclinical study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences shows that Rice’s technology detected even a single malaria-infected cell among a million normal cells with zero false-positive readings.”

 

Hopefully this research will go more than skin deep and be deployed.

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