The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

Has the agile caused a reduction in critical thinking?

 

thinking.pngLately, I’ve been talk to some folks about problems they are having in their production environments. As I talk with them about the issues they encounter it seems clear they don’t even know their environment well enough to ask the right questions, let alone answer them.

 

Critical thinking skills were something where a great deal of work was focused on when computing resources were scarce and thinking time was relatively abundant (because you were sitting around waiting for code to compile). Now those forced breaks are rare, so people spend their time iterating through the coding process without having a chance to take a step back.

 

I don’t think agile techniques should cause a reduction in critical thinking, but I just see the potential is there to not really understand the architecture, the business rational… - since most developers are now so enamored with having working code. If you’re properly doing code reviews/walkthroughs you can outsource some of that big picture work to someone else and you’re forced to think it through.

 

Lately I’ve been looking at Lean Six-sigma techniques and applying them to operations management. This view is not anything new, but the abundance of computing capabilities should allow us to drive the costs out of its application. This technique usually involves asking these same kind of big picture questions although operations is a bit late in the process for that.

 

Do you see these issues too? What do you do about them?

 

The shifting role of the technologist

 

paperwork.jpgWith the increasing capabilities of technologies, adoption is as much about culture as the technologies themselves. It is not enough for a technologist to just keep up with the technical changes to remain relevant, now technologists need to envision the implications and describe it to others, in their context.

 

Understanding the technical implications on the culture of an organization is more important now than ever. As the year winds down and the planning for the new year begins, it is a good time to think about your personal goals, the actions you can do to strengthen your impact and what needs to be done to make the needed changes. Do you need to increase your persuasive skills to make the changes that you know are in store? Are their capabilities within the ecosystem that are holding the organization back? This kind of planning is unique and needs to be individualized.

 

Labels: Context| Future| Vision

Surprise results from the Internet of Underwater Things

shark.pngI’ve mentioned before that many times when you start gathering information with IoT techniques, the results may not always line up with what you originally intended. This article references a study showing evidence that it could be the Sleeper shark that is attacking juvenile Steller sea lions. They are basing the findings on sensing data coming off the tags of the young animals.

 

”We surmise that the sea lions were consumed by a cold-blooded predator because the recorded temperatures aligned with the deep waters of the Gulf of Alaska and not the surface waters.”

 

Based on the article, I doubt this was the original intent of the tagging effort, but once you start getting the data and correlating it with environmental knowledge you can derive quite useful results.

 

When we talk about the ‘things’ we can sense and derive data about, we need to keep our definitions wide.

Tags: IoT| Sensing
Labels: IoT| Sensing

Strategy and abundance?

 

business questions.pngMcKinsey had an interesting article titled: What strategists need: A meeting of the minds. In the article, various strategic thinkers expressed their concerns and views on what will affects corporate strategy efforts.

 

Tthe views on strategic frameworks and goals were enlightening, but it felt to me they were too scarcity focused and not embracing the shift in what is abundant around them. It may be that they view those shifts as tactical in nature, or too simple a foundation for strategy – but I see them as low hanging fruit for organizations to consume. It creates options that can be used to advantage quickly.

 

A point made in the article I’ve seen played out over and over:

“while analysis is very important, developing strategies is ultimately a people-centric process fueled by conversation. Each player brings his or her experiences and biases to the table, and the job of crafting a strategy is to navigate those in a way that is productive. The key is the good questions, and any advice on how to improve questions would be really helpful.”

 

It is often better questions, not better answers that makes the difference in strategic efforts, often those questions can be scarce.

 

The desktop expansion explosion

 

monitor explosion.pngWhen I first started working with WYSIWIG GUI displays, I had a Macintosh SE with a 512x342 display.

 

While doing programming with the Macintosh back in 1990, I had a black and white monitor and a color monitor both with 640x480. One was for debugging and one for the display. I thought I was living life large.

 

Yesterday I hooked up a 28” display running 3840x2160 that is sitting over my laptop display of 1366x768 -- that's quite a trend.

 

By just looking at the commercially available display size over the last 3 decade, it appears to be an exponential growth curve. This makes me wonder where display size will eventually end up? How many desktop pixels are enough??

 

There is no doubt in my mind (depending on what you do), the more desktop space available, the higher your productivity, since it reduces the tasks switching costs.

 

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About the Author(s)
  • Steve Simske is an HP Fellow and Director in the Printing and Content Delivery Lab in Hewlett-Packard Labs, and is the Director and Chief Technologist for the HP Labs Security Printing and Imaging program.
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