The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

Service centric innovation – does it require a change in thinking?

 

SaaS.pngI was just in a stimulating discussion with a co-worker preparing to be part of a panel (that ISSIP is hosting) and looking at the question:

“Most product companies are making a shift from product-centric business models to more service-centric business models?  How does this impact your innovation ecosystem and how can entrepreneurs leverage this trend?”

 

This question seems to be based on the foundation that companies that may be product centric don’t understand services. I don’t actually see this as true. Almost all companies get a significant amount of value from service activities and innovation, even if it is just servicing and maintaining their products. The day of throwing the product out the door and checking the transaction complete are over.

 

In fact the whole IoT phenomenon is based on adding services to devices, whether it is your TV now being able to download content or your thermostat managing temperature based on how the environment around it is being used – these are all services – and IoT will have significant implications.

 

Now I do think there is a fundamental question about how much the context and culture of the companies has changed and if a company’s (or IT’s) approach to innovation has shifting. Since almost everyone lives in a consumer-oriented lifestyle, service innovation has been creeping into our thoughts and expectations for a very long time.

 

We have all this talk about digital natives and digital companies maybe that is all misplaced and we should be looking at it from a services impact and futures perspective. It is not that companies are becoming digital – it is that they are being more services oriented and in the process, hunger for greater information and action.

 

3D printer on ISS

3d printing.pngI mentioned a while back that space exploration and 3D printing were a match made in heaven. Earlier this month, astronauts on the International Space Station received their long anticipated Made in Space Zero-G 3D printer.

 

This is not just your standard 3D printer, it was tested by NASA with over 20,000 print hours of testing. It performed so well that tests were completed early, allowing the printer to be delivered ahead of time. 

 

This article covers the goals of the 3D printer installation in more detail.

Tags: 3D| 3D printing
Labels: 3D| 3D printing

The use of experience and an organizational error culture

 

opps.pngI recently came across a blog on the error culture of organizations. It was focused on: when it comes to learning from errors, it is how an organization behaves that is important.

 

“…when errors do occur, they aren’t swept under the rug. Instead, they’re treated as valuable learning opportunities that help companies avoid the repetition of similar mistakes in the future.”

 

With all the new technology around us and new business trends the old adage that “if you are making mistakes you’re not learning” in more relevant than ever.

 

On the other hand, we need to benefit from those previous errors. I see lots of discussions about ITIL and ITSM and their role in helping organizations deliver more reliable services. These are not just academic exercises, the learnings (of the users, operations…) need to be reinvested in improved practices, even in these very dynamic new models.

 

All too often, the new flexible techniques view basic operational approaches as constraining or even unnecessary. It makes me ask people how they will understand the ‘normal’ operations of the system and be able to see a pattern where intervention is needed. One thing is clear, you don’t want to learn how to fire a gun in the middle of a firefight. Similarly, you don’t want to diagnose a system for the first time when it is going (or has gone) down. Experience is needed to help talk people through this process, since it is rarely taught and needs to be felt.

 

Video Game History Museum coming soon

video game.pngPeople sometimes overlook the role of the video game in shifting the understanding and expectations of our culture and industry. Many technologies like 3D, augmented reality, surround sound… were first experienced in an arcade somewhere in our youth. The first hands on experience with a computer individuals interfaced with on a daily basis was a gaming console at home.

 

Opening someday soon near me will be the nation’s first museum dedicated to video games. The Videogame History Museum includes a wide range of game types and games. I look forward to its opening.

Morse code and wearables?

watch.pngWhen looking at the capability of the wearables, and thinking about new interface possibilities of haptic interface on the wrist. It makes me wonder if there could be a resurgence of Morse code.

 

If short text messages can be reliably provided via vibrations that no one else can sense in the room (and they can’t tell you’re getting the information) – what are the possibilities?

 

An interface can be done with either left/right side vibration or traditional short or long ‘tone’ techniques.

 

I doubt that the market would be large, but there probably is one for this proven mechanism to send a short message.

Labels: IoT| User Interface
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About the Author(s)
  • Steve Simske is an HP Fellow and Director in the Printing and Content Delivery Lab in Hewlett-Packard Labs, and is the Director and Chief Technologist for the HP Labs Security Printing and Imaging program.
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