The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

Displaying articles for: January 2014

A services framework for a one-stop experience

The core capabilities of IT organizations for the future definitely require the ability to manage 3rd parties effectively as well as the ability to deploy services seamlessly and securely. Tools and techniques are needed to enable this more dynamic environment.

 

For many organizations the Lines of Business have become frustrated with their ability to get what they need quickly and took matters into their own hands building up a layer of shadow IT (shadow IT can become a significant portion of the IT spend).

 

I try not to post too much on HP specific tools, except when it seems they are not getting the visibility they need – it was talked about back in December, but now it’s real.

 

HP Propel free catalog service is focused on helping deliver IT services. It was released today. Propel was announced on December 3rd 2013 and presented at HP Discover in Barcelona and in the web event on January 8 of this year.

 

HP Propel is the new services framework that delivers a modern portal, a service catalog, knowledge management, news feeds, and an open service exchange. It provides a unified experience to enterprise users, facilitating self-service support with aggregated catalog strategy and friendly request handling through integrated fulfilment engines. HP offers Propel as a free and as a premium service.

The key features of HP Propel free include:

  • Single portal as the one-stop shop for all IT services, from the latest IT news, shopping from a standard service catalog, or searching for the latest knowledge articles curated by HP.  Accessible from the web or mobile device, Propel is available in English, French and German.
  • Standard catalog with 100 of the most common IT services, fulfilled through email requests to IT’s existing back-end fulfillment engines.
  • Knowledge base with immediate access to 500 knowledge articles from HP IT, applicable to any user and IT organization.
  • IT News to keep end users informed and up-to-date. You can load your own RSS feeds to share your latest IT service information with web and mobile users.

 

Key benefits for customers using HP Propel free:

  • Quick startup of the Propel free service.
  • No upfront investment and operations.
  • Accelerated time-to-value in delivering your IT services, while continuing to use all existing service management products, for example HP or third party products.

Customers who wish to move to a more robust, premium service can design their own customized solution.

 

Take a look at the capabilities yourself, just register for Propel free.

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Approaching UCC and mobility

working together.GIFI was just in conversation with an individual about what should be the common concerns about organizations implementing Unified Communications and mobility.

 

The first thing I thought of is that these are both really environmental concerns for the individual and the organization. They are not really about technologies, although technologies definitely help address the requirements when they are identified. It is really the business requirements driving this forward though to make decisions faster or better. It can be about costs, but that misses the real opportunity.

 

So our discussion moved to who should be involved when addressing these areas. My first thought was to the business people who have problems that need to be solved. Then the enterprise architects who understand the current environment at a macro level and how the current business needs are addressed. And then the technical individuals who understand the capabilities of the new technologies. These people have to be flexible enough to think about the abundance of capabilities that are provided and how they address the shifting needs of the business. Who else should be involved?

 

When you think about these technologies and what they do… for most of mankind’s existence, we were only able to communicate with those we could physically meet and interact. Writing and printing allowed us to move on and share ideas across space and time, but only in one direction. Then first with the telegraph and then with the telephone we enabled bi-directional communications in real time. For about the last decade, we’ve had mobile and UCC and are still learning what we can do with their capabilities. We’re communicating now not just with people but with machines that have capabilities as well. We’re putting ‘smarts’ in more and more products and so our ability to act remotely and repeatedly is increasing.

 

UCC and mobile have a significant role to play but only when we start thinking of them less as a technology and more as a lever for greater business value generation.

New vision for computing

eye.pngIEEE Spectrum had an article on moving display technology closer to the eye. Whether it is virtual reality goggles or contact lens enabled displays, it appears there is a great effort being applied to move displays closer than ever. The demonstration of a combined contact/glasses based display approach shows the level of innovation that is underway – not that I think that approach will be viable in the marketplace.

 

If you combine that with speech or gesture recognition, it leads to a technological approach that could be safer and more ubiquitous than what’s been done before. Naturally, there are some people who think that these displays are risky in certain circumstances.

 

Even as access to networking and computing permeate more of our business and personal lives, the display has been one dimension that has been holding back application in many domains. I can easily see a mechanic or others who hands are typically busy doing work using techniques like this to reference manuals… and facilitate decisions. Who knows if these techniques can be applied in a transparent and effective way, they could lead to the one display that is used by all the devices around us.

 

It makes me ask questions about how applications would change if this were available? What new business solutions are possible??

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About the Author(s)
  • Steve Simske is an HP Fellow and Director in the Printing and Content Delivery Lab in Hewlett-Packard Labs, and is the Director and Chief Technologist for the HP Labs Security Printing and Imaging program.
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