The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

Has the agile caused a reduction in critical thinking?

 

thinking.pngLately, I’ve been talk to some folks about problems they are having in their production environments. As I talk with them about the issues they encounter it seems clear they don’t even know their environment well enough to ask the right questions, let alone answer them.

 

Critical thinking skills were something where a great deal of work was focused on when computing resources were scarce and thinking time was relatively abundant (because you were sitting around waiting for code to compile). Now those forced breaks are rare, so people spend their time iterating through the coding process without having a chance to take a step back.

 

I don’t think agile techniques should cause a reduction in critical thinking, but I just see the potential is there to not really understand the architecture, the business rational… - since most developers are now so enamored with having working code. If you’re properly doing code reviews/walkthroughs you can outsource some of that big picture work to someone else and you’re forced to think it through.

 

Lately I’ve been looking at Lean Six-sigma techniques and applying them to operations management. This view is not anything new, but the abundance of computing capabilities should allow us to drive the costs out of its application. This technique usually involves asking these same kind of big picture questions although operations is a bit late in the process for that.

 

Do you see these issues too? What do you do about them?

 

Will there be a new dimension to UI design based on cognitive computing?

things.jpgI recently read a report on How Humans Respond to Robots that focused on the social side of robotics. Near the end of the article it started to talk about autonomous cars, autopilots and other devices that are really robots but we don’t normally think of them that way (e.g., smart thermostats) because of their minimal user interface.

 

In a world where we’ll soon have wearable technologies all around us, likely building to a $50 billion market by 2017, pumping out data to feed the autonomous response of cognitive computing, it does make me wonder how enterprise architectures and application portfolios will drive us into the uncanny valley for business automation.

 

As we automate things and find patterns, the automated response could be a bit eerie and unsettling. Likely a new dimension for User Interface Designers of the future will look beyond just the traditional capabilities and more deeply into user intent and the sense of user interactions – so we can accept the assistance as intended.

Does personal accountability need to shift in business?

security.pngAs business and IT continues to merge, we need to increase the vigilance and expectations of everyone. A recent article titled: Treat IT architecture as a weapon talks about how the US military should start to treat the network and IT resources in general as weapons systems. The same can be said on the commercial side of business.

 

As we move to a world with high-powered analytics, and deep, data-based understanding enabled by the IoT, the models, architectures and assets need to be viewed as the serious differentiator for the business they actually are. When the network is breached, a root cause analysis needs to be performed and individuals held accountable. The responses of “I didn’t know…” or “I am not in IT…” need to be a thing of the past.

 

In our personal lives, we know we have responsibilities for our data usage and access. We need at least that same level of accountability in our work lives as well. We all need to be vigilant and help each other understand the implications of our actions. Security awareness needs to permeate the work environment – it is not just someone else’s concern.

Start small but think big, when transforming

StartSmallThinkBig.jpgYesterday, I posted about how we’re half-way through the current stage of IT and mentioned how IT needs to change. Today, I saw an interesting post from McKinsey & Company that has some similar views: Reinventing IT to support digitization.

 

They have identified seven elements critical to IT performance improvement:

1)      Clear, central business leadership on digital

2)      Elite IT talent

3)      Sourcing arrangements to scale the workforce rapidly

4)      Agile development and rapid releases

5)      Rapid innovation architecture supported by stable services

6)      Scalable cloud-based infrastructure

7)      High-quality integrated data

 

I agree with all those points, although I’d have dropped off the ‘on digital’ from the first point. I think all too often we continue to unnecessarily isolate the information technology goals and efforts from the business.

 

The article went on to describe a two-speed approach to transformation. This is one area that is as much about risk control as providing new capabilities. Start small but think big – is probably the rule. We can’t change everything at once and when making this kind of change, you need to develop experience.

This was driven home to me the other day when I was talking with my son (who teaches on-line). He was looking for a way to contact his students in a flexible, yet automated fashion. I said “Oh, no problem. I’ll just write an app for your phone.” I’ve written apps for a number of different mobile platforms over the years, so I thought it would be easy. I laid out a storyboard of the various screens. I bounced requirements off him. I knew exactly what I wanted to do, to make it look professional.

 

I dug into coding the first prototype. It seemed everywhere I turned, the Android environment didn’t want to support me in my efforts. It just didn’t have the fundamentals in the OS that I needed (or maybe the way I wanted them). So, I started to break the application down into various components that I could understand, validate and execute. Eventually, I will stitch them all together into a final application, but my first goal now is to get something dumb and functional that he can play with – without all the bells and whistles that were in the early design. A page out of any Agile Development handbook.

 

The same approach is needed as an organization starts to tackle its larger business support role and reinvention of its application portfolio.

Dimensions of assessing an agile architecture?

measurement.pngI keep hearing that organizations have greater expectations from their IT organizations than are being delivered. Shadow IT is the response as the business-side of the enterprise decides to go-it-alone. Many times those investments are done in a relative vacuum when compared to the rest of the organization’s portfolio.

 

As businesses move to be more agile and make better informed decisions, the focus is on being flexible in a number of dimensions:

  • Location – where and when works takes place
  • Social – relationships with and between customers, partners, devices and employees
  • Secure – what, why and how much in good enough
  • Process – for the past, now and in the future
  • Insight – what is and will be happening, and why

In continuing to think along the lines of the post on agile architecture, it makes me wonder how an architecture can be measured along these lines in the dimensions of time and value. Even though the requirements for the architecture can’t be nailed down do the perspectives (like those listed) remain constant? Should we also build into our thinking how long we think the architecture element is viable? That can be a tough issue as evidenced by the continued contributions of mainframes, COBOL and other technologies that are pretty far along the ripe cycle.

 

I recently read a thought provoking article titled: Management in the Second Machine Age that made me wonder about the effects of automation on IT architects as well. If you can measure it, you are closer to being able to automate it.

Search
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Do you mean 
Follow Us
Featured
About the Author(s)
  • Steve Simske is an HP Fellow and Director in the Printing and Content Delivery Lab in Hewlett-Packard Labs, and is the Director and Chief Technologist for the HP Labs Security Printing and Imaging program.
Labels
The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation.