The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

This week is National Engineer’s Week.

eweek.pngThis week is National Engineer’s Week.

 

Founded by NSPE in 1951, EWeek (February 22–28, 2015) is dedicated to ensuring a diverse and well-educated future engineering workforce by increasing understanding of and interest in engineering and technology careers.

 

I mentioned the Raspberry Pi in space effort and will be judging a robotics competition later this week. What engineering related activities will be going on near you?

STEM in space...

raspberry PI.pngI do quite a bit of work with STEM efforts in the spring, so this week when I saw the blog post on the Astro Pi Mission Update it was exciting. For those who are not familiar with the Raspberry Pi, it is a low cost, experimenter’s computer. And now it is going to the International Space Station along with the British astronaut Tim Peake.

 

What is the most exciting though is that UK schools can have the same hardware that will be used for experiments on the space station and incorporated into the classwork! I am sure this is getting a great deal of press in the UK, but I’d not heard about it here.

 

The unit being used is a Raspberry Pi 1 Model B+ with a special HAT (Hardware Attached on Top) module. This module will have a collection of sensors specifically designed for use in this mission, and an 8x8 matrix of LEDs. You can even buy your own (when it is soon released).

 

That is exciting in itself but taking it a step further (at least from a gamification perspective) is the Astro Pi competition. UK schools can enter and submit programs, and experiments, and the winning submission will be taken on the mission and performed on the space station, itself.

 

These are the types of activities that generate new scientists and engineers. I am going to be judging the FIRST Robotics Competition in Dallas again next week and it has similar aspirations of impact.

Digital Textbooks could be a signpost to other significant changes

smartbook.pngLately, I’ve been thinking quite a bit about smarter businesses and having an enterprise autopilot. Concentrating on these grand and glorious possibilities can allow us to overlook more mundane and common smart systems that will have significant impact.

 

New Scientist had an article a while back: Digital textbooks adapt to your level as you learn. It describes rethinking textbooks. After all, they are there to help us learn – what if that can be done significantly better. What if the use of the book informs the author or teacher of areas to be improved in the book or the class as well as the student?

 

The data in the ebooks today (e.g., ePub) wouldn’t actually need to change, but the way it is presented and the interaction approach that has more in common with IoT techniques could be continuously improved. What else in our environment of things we use could use this kind of thinking??

Tags: education| IoT
Labels: Education| IoT

Computer Science Education Week

education2.pngThe National Science Foundation (NSF) and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) kicked off Computer Science Education Week earlier this week with an event in Washington, D.C., celebrating new commitments and partnerships among the Federal government, school districts, nonprofits, foundations, private industry, and others that will expand access to, and student learning in, computer science in the K12 space.

 

If we think the millennials are digital natives, this next wave will embrace IoT and other computing advances to a whole new level.

 

It always makes me wonder how the future of services is being embraced within our educational systems and what we should do about it.

The use of experience and an organizational error culture

 

opps.pngI recently came across a blog on the error culture of organizations. It was focused on: when it comes to learning from errors, it is how an organization behaves that is important.

 

“…when errors do occur, they aren’t swept under the rug. Instead, they’re treated as valuable learning opportunities that help companies avoid the repetition of similar mistakes in the future.”

 

With all the new technology around us and new business trends the old adage that “if you are making mistakes you’re not learning” in more relevant than ever.

 

On the other hand, we need to benefit from those previous errors. I see lots of discussions about ITIL and ITSM and their role in helping organizations deliver more reliable services. These are not just academic exercises, the learnings (of the users, operations…) need to be reinvested in improved practices, even in these very dynamic new models.

 

All too often, the new flexible techniques view basic operational approaches as constraining or even unnecessary. It makes me ask people how they will understand the ‘normal’ operations of the system and be able to see a pattern where intervention is needed. One thing is clear, you don’t want to learn how to fire a gun in the middle of a firefight. Similarly, you don’t want to diagnose a system for the first time when it is going (or has gone) down. Experience is needed to help talk people through this process, since it is rarely taught and needs to be felt.

 

Search
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Do you mean 
Follow Us
Featured
About the Author(s)
  • Steve Simske is an HP Fellow and Director in the Printing and Content Delivery Lab in Hewlett-Packard Labs, and is the Director and Chief Technologist for the HP Labs Security Printing and Imaging program.
Labels
The opinions expressed above are the personal opinions of the authors, not of HP. By using this site, you accept the Terms of Use and Rules of Participation.