The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

Hype fatigue

Recently there has been quite a bit of press about over-hyped technologies. Gartner came out with a list of their top 10 back in August. They also included a discussion of frameworks for these technologies:

  • IoT and operational technologies
  • Mobile Infrastructure
  • Enterprise Mobility Management
  • Analytics
  • Big Data
  • Social
  • Cloud

I actually think a few of those overlap but it’s their article. I was also surprised that security didn’t make the list but maybe they view that security needs to permeate the whole environment. Dr. Dobbs also came out with their own post of Overhyped things. Not a new topic, since I did a post on over-hype back in 2007.

 

Now that we’re into the last quarter of the year, we’re going to start seeing more game-changing technology trend articles. Even the IEEE has their own Top Tech Trends for 2014 article.

 

One thing that concerns me is that so many of these trends are just reworked analysis of those same article from the past. Are there no new trends? Or are we just tired of change and it is easier to just repackage stuff. I’ll have to give this some thought before I do my annual trends to look out for in December for 2015 post.

 

I also wonder if we shouldn’t look at the entire life cycle, not just the hype cycle -- even though there never seems to be extinction in this business.

 

entire lifecycle.png

Another Internet of Things Example of Something We Didn’t Know We Needed…

coffee.gifIEEE Spectrum had a post earlier this month about the Vessyl, a drinking cup with enough sensing to recognize the contents (at the molecular level). Sure it is expensive right now, but in technology it has only one way its price can go – down.

 

It is an example of the ideas discussed previously about what you can do when your IoT environment knows both the context of what is happening and your desires. For some people, it may seem like a bad thing to be told they are drinking too much caffeine or sugar, for others (with high blood pressure or diabetes) it can be an important part of sticking to their plan.

 

We are in a world of an ever increasing number of choices that can help us do what we want. The possibilities opening up around us, if we want to look for them. Cups are just the start...

Labels: Context| Future| IEEE| IoT| Sensing

IoT standards war begins

tug of war.pngI seem to have done quite a number of blog posts in the last month related to the Internet of Things. I just noticed that there have been numerous announcements about standards efforts. This may have spurred me on. 

 

There are a number of them, but the three I’ve seen the most about are:

  • AllSeen Alliance that supports the open source project AllJoyn that provides “a universal software framework and core set of system services that enable interoperability among connected products and software applications across manufacturers to create dynamic proximal networks.”
  • The Open Interconnect Consortium with “the goal of defining the connectivity requirements and ensuring interoperability of the billions of devices that will make up the emerging Internet of Things. “
  • And Google (not to be left out) has defined Thread. Its goal is: “To create the very best way to connect and control products in the home. “ These devices all run over IEEE 802.15.4.

The IEEE has its own set of IoT standards efforts, but those haven’t been getting the press as the recently announced ones above.

 

It is clear that IoT needs standards, but if it is too fragmented there will be no standard at all.

 

Hopefully this will shake out soon, since standards will help make the services and the software needed that actually provide the value for the end consumer.

 

Preventing the IoT from being the Oort cloud of the enterprise

riding comet.pngLast month, IEEE Spectrum had an article on how Most Technologists Upbeat About Future Internet of Things and I am optimistic as well --do you really think being down about it will prevent it from happening? I mentioned that ubiquitous power is a prerequisite for the IoT to really take off, at least for some applications.

 

On the same day I gave an IoT intro presentation I was in an exchange with CIOs about rogue clouds, in the process I made a joke pointing out that rogue clouds are the Oort cloud of IT - an area we don’t pay any attention to until something is about to impact our business.

 

There are a number of challenges for technologist to overcome. For every positive aspect, there is a negative trap to fall into and be prevented or at least understood.

 

Challenge

Positive

Negative

Privacy/Security

A view into what is actually going on

Passive oversharing

Identity

Knowing what is what

Device ‘identity’ mistaken for true identity- people become a network address

Efficiency

Speed

Unemployment

Decisions

Automation takes latency out

Loss of freedom and understanding, if automation becomes just another legacy system

Culture

Gamification

Big Brother and data bias

 

What are some of the other issues that have both positive and negative dimensions??

Autonomous vehicles now, near and someday

autonomous car.pngIEEE Spectrum had an article on the current state of self-driving cars -- many of these features are already in commercially available cars. They may not seem like much, but they are the foundation for those fully autonomous cars we keep hearing about. It will be closer to the end of the decade before we see those in any volume.

 

One of the areas that will be deployed sooner is vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications. V2V communications is made up of a WiFi like wireless network where automobiles (and infrastructure – V2I) send messages to each other with information about what they’re doing. This research once implemented should aid people in driving more safely, by taking latency out of the response to situations.

 

This will have all the complications and security/privacy requirements that IoT implementations should address.

 

It is not just cars we’re trying to make smarter, there are also efforts to make the roads smarter as well.

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About the Author(s)
  • Steve Simske is an HP Fellow and Director in the Printing and Content Delivery Lab in Hewlett-Packard Labs, and is the Director and Chief Technologist for the HP Labs Security Printing and Imaging program.
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