The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

The multi-dimensional value of IoT

dimensions.pngThe value and inevitable nature of the Internet of Things can be hard to quantify.

 

It has value in the vertical dimension based on what it can do for a particular industry. For example being able to understand the materials on hand, the machine capability and performance and the product location all can fit together to provide much greater insight. This is one of the reasons the manufacturing industry was an early adopter of IoT techniques.

 

From a breadth perspective, we’re seeing more devices with connectivity as well as more wearables and other ways to communicate. I can easily see a day where my oven reminds me of a meals status much more effectively than the kitchen timer. Or even the act of entering the garage can get dinner started because that’s what would be next on my agenda. Essentially it leads to a much broader range of devices working in collaboration to meet my needs.

 

In a depth sense, various devices that are doing their own thing, for their own reasons can provide a much greater contextual depth of understanding that any single view could provide. This is where the contextual understanding that is derived from multiple pieces of information comes into play.

 

I am sure there are more dimensions beyond these three… What are they for you?

 

Will the Internet of Things turn all CEOs into CIOs?

 

CEO.pngSince the CIO's role is focused on generating business value out of information securely and reliably, and now an ever increasing percentage of our enterprise environment will be collaborating in that goal – the CEO’s dependence and need to manage the use of information will increase.

 

IoT means sensitive information, can be derived leading to information about enterprise operation details and personal data crossing from secure networks to devices and third party services. The risk and the benefit are far different than what traditional CIOs have had to address. The CEO will need to understand (at least at some level) the rapidly changing world of security and information consumption and the implications of IoT – even if it is just to make sure that the delegated business and IT responsibilities are being addressed effectively.

 

Some view that IoT hype has peaked. If that is the case, it would only be because organizations have internalized the change, but I doubt that. I think we have a long way to go before the possibilities are even well understood, let alone embraced and incorporated to generate value outside the initial deployment silos.

Leaders need to ask two questions:

  • So what? – find out the perspective of business value for the effort
  • Is that all? – see if the teams are thinking broadly enough about where and how the information can be used. There seems to be a great deal of potential being left on the table.

 

Podcast discussing the implications of the Internet of Things

Internet of things.pngRecently, James Haight of Blue Hill Research interviewed me for a podcast discussing the Internet of Things.  We covered a wide range of topics like the future enabled by IoT, business and societal impacts of IoT, just to name a few.

 

We covered quite a bit of territory during the 30 interview – I must have been in a caffeine induced state, since I did chatter on pretty rapidly.

 

Hopefully you’ll get as much out of it as I had fun doing the podcast.

Tags: future| IoT| Trends| Vision
Labels: Future| IoT| Trends| Vision

Another Internet of Things Example of Something We Didn’t Know We Needed…

coffee.gifIEEE Spectrum had a post earlier this month about the Vessyl, a drinking cup with enough sensing to recognize the contents (at the molecular level). Sure it is expensive right now, but in technology it has only one way its price can go – down.

 

It is an example of the ideas discussed previously about what you can do when your IoT environment knows both the context of what is happening and your desires. For some people, it may seem like a bad thing to be told they are drinking too much caffeine or sugar, for others (with high blood pressure or diabetes) it can be an important part of sticking to their plan.

 

We are in a world of an ever increasing number of choices that can help us do what we want. The possibilities opening up around us, if we want to look for them. Cups are just the start...

Labels: Context| Future| IEEE| IoT| Sensing

Serious gaming that takes nerve…

neuron.pngEarlier this month I saw an article in Popular Science: Gamers Reveal Inner Workings of the Eye. Since I have an interest in gamification, I dug in a bit more. It turns out there was a story in May on NPR morning edition Eyewire: A Computer Game to Map the Eye that covered the same concept.

 

Eyewire is an example of a serious game that tackles a real problem using gaming techniques. It is not your typical business gamification implementation but an example non-the-less. To play the game, he players have to pick out specific cells in pictures of tissue the retina and color them in.

 

“Each player gets a high resolution picture of a different section of the retina to color. The trick to scoring point in the game is to only color the parts of the image that are nerve cells. This is something that's surprisingly difficult and humans are actually better at it than computers.”

 

Over 130,000 people from 145 countries have played the game so it must be both challenging and rewarding.

 

When we look at the abundance of IT capability and the wealth of information being generated by the Internet of Things, we are likely to see whole new levels of gamification techniques come into play, as we try to dig deeper for patterns and understanding or gather and inject insight right at the time decisions are being made.

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About the Author(s)
  • Steve Simske is an HP Fellow and Director in the Printing and Content Delivery Lab in Hewlett-Packard Labs, and is the Director and Chief Technologist for the HP Labs Security Printing and Imaging program.
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