The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

The shifting world of business continuity

disaster2.pngI was in an exchange this week with an individual talking about business continuity. The view that business continuity needs to focus on:

An organizations business continuity approach need to be reassessed in a world of high levels of automation, contracting for services and reduced latency. The very definition of foundational terms like ‘work location’, ‘services’ and ‘support’ are changing. Diversity of perspective is likely to be a critical component of any kind of timely, situation response.

 

“The management of business continuity falls largely within the sphere of risk management, with some cross-over into related fields such as governance, information security and compliance. Risk is a core consideration since business continuity is primarily concerned with those business functions, operations, supplies, systems, relationships etc. that are critically important to achieve the organization's operational objectives. Business Impact Analysis is the generally accepted risk management term for the process of determining the relative importance or criticality of those elements, and in turn drives the priorities, planning, preparations and other business continuity management activities.”

 

In today’s environment, business impact analysis is becoming ever more technical and the interconnection between environmental factors more complex. We have seen situations recently with program trading that an entire financial institution has been placed at risk when their automated trading responds in an unforeseen fashion or their governance breaks down. We’ll be seeing similar techniques applied throughout organizational processes.

 

The response to almost any situation can be enabled by techniques like VOIP and other approaches that allow additional levels of abstraction. Simulations can be used to understand the implications of various scenarios as part of business continuity planning.

 

As I mentioned back in March:

Having an effective, robust approach to business continuity is part of management, security and many other roles within an organization.  It is important to remember that there is a cost for being unable to respond to an incident.

Context, automation and the future of services

looking for direction.jpgThere recently was a story about a computer program that passed the Turing Test. When you get into the details of what was actually done, I am not sure it really qualifies. The fact that people are talking about the event though is enough to show that we’re pretty far down the road toward breaking down the perceived barriers between machines and human interaction.

 

These advanced levels of interaction capability are enabled by a new wave of AI applications that can capture context at scale and in near real-time. These solutions when they move out of the labs should be able to consume massive amounts of information and generate contextual understanding at a level that even the most intuitive individual would find difficult to match.

 

You might ask what does this mean for the future of services. Or where will it be of use to my organization? It should be applicable at just about any point where a conversation occurs with customer or between:

  • employee and employee
  • organization and organization
  • government and citizen

We may be able to automate interaction that isn’t face-to-face and even then it may need to be person to person with the likelihood we can overcome the uncanny valley.

 

These new context-aware, AI enabled interactions can provide a multi-level view on engagements and ‘experience’, allowing organizations to filter through the noise and latency (for example waiting for certain skills -- Spanish language) and shift the focus to an enriching experience, relationships, and achieving goals. I can easily see a future talking with an AI agent at the drive-up window, as a low-hanging opportunity.

 

The recent book The Second Machine Age, examines how society, the economy, and business will transform as digital technologies and smarter machines increasingly take over human occupations.

 

It makes you look for direction about who will robots put out of work? This interactive graphic from Quartz takes a stab at answering that question—exploring which U.S. jobs are most likely to become automated, and how many workers could be affected.

Preventing the IoT from being the Oort cloud of the enterprise

riding comet.pngLast month, IEEE Spectrum had an article on how Most Technologists Upbeat About Future Internet of Things and I am optimistic as well --do you really think being down about it will prevent it from happening? I mentioned that ubiquitous power is a prerequisite for the IoT to really take off, at least for some applications.

 

On the same day I gave an IoT intro presentation I was in an exchange with CIOs about rogue clouds, in the process I made a joke pointing out that rogue clouds are the Oort cloud of IT - an area we don’t pay any attention to until something is about to impact our business.

 

There are a number of challenges for technologist to overcome. For every positive aspect, there is a negative trap to fall into and be prevented or at least understood.

 

Challenge

Positive

Negative

Privacy/Security

A view into what is actually going on

Passive oversharing

Identity

Knowing what is what

Device ‘identity’ mistaken for true identity- people become a network address

Efficiency

Speed

Unemployment

Decisions

Automation takes latency out

Loss of freedom and understanding, if automation becomes just another legacy system

Culture

Gamification

Big Brother and data bias

 

What are some of the other issues that have both positive and negative dimensions??

Autonomous vehicles now, near and someday

autonomous car.pngIEEE Spectrum had an article on the current state of self-driving cars -- many of these features are already in commercially available cars. They may not seem like much, but they are the foundation for those fully autonomous cars we keep hearing about. It will be closer to the end of the decade before we see those in any volume.

 

One of the areas that will be deployed sooner is vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications. V2V communications is made up of a WiFi like wireless network where automobiles (and infrastructure – V2I) send messages to each other with information about what they’re doing. This research once implemented should aid people in driving more safely, by taking latency out of the response to situations.

 

This will have all the complications and security/privacy requirements that IoT implementations should address.

 

It is not just cars we’re trying to make smarter, there are also efforts to make the roads smarter as well.

Data, the lifeblood of the enterprise

data lifeblood.jpgEven though object-oriented techniques and analytics have been around since the last century, today they are being applied and thought about in whole new ways. Technologies are enabling objects to interact with monitoring, analytics, and control systems over a diverse range of networks and on a plethora of devices. Computers are embedded in devices and rarely thought of as devices themselves, by most people.

 

This more connected and action-oriented approach will expand the reach and impact of information technology systems, impacting business value generation, applications expectations, and use cases where IT hasn’t really been focused effectively before.

 

One of the exciting aspects of this intelligent edge approach to the business use of IT is that the software will enable greater control of the physical world, not just the digital one. This means less latency and more efficient use of resources (including human attention). For many, this started in the consumer space, and is only now being embraced within business.

 

The importance of this information and its integration into the business means that the focus on security will need to increase, protecting the data as well as the control data streams. This flow will become like the blood flow of the human body, if it is interrupted or somehow contaminated – bad things happen.

 

With gamification techniques, this information flow can be used to adjust human behaviors as well as machines. How organizations think about and deal with data is already changing.

 

Everyone needs to get comfortable with:

  1. The data sets we’re working with today will look trivial within the relatively near future. Storage technology will continue to get larger and cheaper.
  2. We’ll keep the data longer and continue to generate new value from the data in use today. Data is a corporate asset and we need to treat it as such.
  3. Data scientists will be in high-demand and business schools will branch into this area in a big way, if they haven’t already.
  4. The conflict between real-time access to information and the security implications will continue to be a concern
  5. The use of cloud techniques will mean that organizations will need to start feeling comfortable with moving the computing to the data more often than the data to the computing. The pipes are big, but not that big.
  6. The diversity of devices used to access the information and the locations they are accessed from will continue to increase. BYOD is not about devices.
  7. Master data and metadata management are critical skills to get the most out of big data efforts. Even if they can’t be synchronized, they need to be understood.

 

We have the computing and bandwidth capabilities, it is just our imaginations on how to use it that limits us.

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About the Author(s)
  • Steve Simske is an HP Fellow and Director in the Printing and Content Delivery Lab in Hewlett-Packard Labs, and is the Director and Chief Technologist for the HP Labs Security Printing and Imaging program.
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