The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

Will the Internet of Things turn all CEOs into CIOs?

 

CEO.pngSince the CIO's role is focused on generating business value out of information securely and reliably, and now an ever increasing percentage of our enterprise environment will be collaborating in that goal – the CEO’s dependence and need to manage the use of information will increase.

 

IoT means sensitive information, can be derived leading to information about enterprise operation details and personal data crossing from secure networks to devices and third party services. The risk and the benefit are far different than what traditional CIOs have had to address. The CEO will need to understand (at least at some level) the rapidly changing world of security and information consumption and the implications of IoT – even if it is just to make sure that the delegated business and IT responsibilities are being addressed effectively.

 

Some view that IoT hype has peaked. If that is the case, it would only be because organizations have internalized the change, but I doubt that. I think we have a long way to go before the possibilities are even well understood, let alone embraced and incorporated to generate value outside the initial deployment silos.

Leaders need to ask two questions:

  • So what? – find out the perspective of business value for the effort
  • Is that all? – see if the teams are thinking broadly enough about where and how the information can be used. There seems to be a great deal of potential being left on the table.

 

IT as outsiders, a luxury no one can afford

 

alone.pngRecently, Terry Bennett (someone from the Dallas area I’ve known for quite a while) wrote a post about Overcoming Your IT Department’s Outsider Reputation. I have finally gotten around to giving it a quick response. In his post he says:

“At a time when all companies need everyone on one team pulling together, IT professionals are often seen by others as ... well ... different.”

 

This seems like a luxury no one can afford. He mentions a number of approaches to shift IT personnel behavior:

  • Change the IT mindset
  • Align goals
  • Show your appreciation
  • Participate in company activities

It really gets down to being aware and involved in the business and its culture and not to look at your role (in IT) as part of a different industry.

 

I sometimes ask people: “If you win and the company doesn’t, did you actually win?”

 

As services becomes an ever increasing part of the economy and the revenue stream for companies, it needs to be sure not to fall into the same trap. This is also a concept those in the outsourcing space need to embrace with the customers – to the extent possible.

 

New HP automotive industry e-zine

Lately I’ve been blogging quite a bit about the Internet of Things. Few industries are so permeated with IoT activities (both in production and in their products) than automotive. Periodically the HP Enterprise Services team focused on automotive create an e-zine and the new one just came out. At least I think it should be out there by now. If not, it will be soon. Here is a brief video about the effort:

 

 

You can see the latest edition of the e-zine here. The previous edition of the e-zine is located here. If you are really interested, you can sign up for a subscription service so the new information is pushed to you directly.

 

You can also download the latest digital edition!

 

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IoT standards war begins

tug of war.pngI seem to have done quite a number of blog posts in the last month related to the Internet of Things. I just noticed that there have been numerous announcements about standards efforts. This may have spurred me on. 

 

There are a number of them, but the three I’ve seen the most about are:

  • AllSeen Alliance that supports the open source project AllJoyn that provides “a universal software framework and core set of system services that enable interoperability among connected products and software applications across manufacturers to create dynamic proximal networks.”
  • The Open Interconnect Consortium with “the goal of defining the connectivity requirements and ensuring interoperability of the billions of devices that will make up the emerging Internet of Things. “
  • And Google (not to be left out) has defined Thread. Its goal is: “To create the very best way to connect and control products in the home. “ These devices all run over IEEE 802.15.4.

The IEEE has its own set of IoT standards efforts, but those haven’t been getting the press as the recently announced ones above.

 

It is clear that IoT needs standards, but if it is too fragmented there will be no standard at all.

 

Hopefully this will shake out soon, since standards will help make the services and the software needed that actually provide the value for the end consumer.

 

The shifting world of business continuity

disaster2.pngI was in an exchange this week with an individual talking about business continuity. The view that business continuity needs to focus on:

An organizations business continuity approach need to be reassessed in a world of high levels of automation, contracting for services and reduced latency. The very definition of foundational terms like ‘work location’, ‘services’ and ‘support’ are changing. Diversity of perspective is likely to be a critical component of any kind of timely, situation response.

 

“The management of business continuity falls largely within the sphere of risk management, with some cross-over into related fields such as governance, information security and compliance. Risk is a core consideration since business continuity is primarily concerned with those business functions, operations, supplies, systems, relationships etc. that are critically important to achieve the organization's operational objectives. Business Impact Analysis is the generally accepted risk management term for the process of determining the relative importance or criticality of those elements, and in turn drives the priorities, planning, preparations and other business continuity management activities.”

 

In today’s environment, business impact analysis is becoming ever more technical and the interconnection between environmental factors more complex. We have seen situations recently with program trading that an entire financial institution has been placed at risk when their automated trading responds in an unforeseen fashion or their governance breaks down. We’ll be seeing similar techniques applied throughout organizational processes.

 

The response to almost any situation can be enabled by techniques like VOIP and other approaches that allow additional levels of abstraction. Simulations can be used to understand the implications of various scenarios as part of business continuity planning.

 

As I mentioned back in March:

Having an effective, robust approach to business continuity is part of management, security and many other roles within an organization.  It is important to remember that there is a cost for being unable to respond to an incident.

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About the Author(s)
  • Steve Simske is an HP Fellow and Director in the Printing and Content Delivery Lab in Hewlett-Packard Labs, and is the Director and Chief Technologist for the HP Labs Security Printing and Imaging program.
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