The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

Why is the service research agenda important?

decisions.pngI continue to think about the characteristics that will make up jobs of the future and the kind of services research the NSF needs to define – and why??

 

During our discussions last week, we talked about measures of quality and risk for services, but primarily from the service provider and sometimes from the service consumer’s perspective. What about for an outside entity, like the government? They have expectations of services as well. If the government doesn’t define and encourage new jobs for its constituents, the tax base erodes and power is lost. If enough power is lost than a revolution takes place by people who will redefine the power base and power structure.

 

That is why the service research agenda is so fundamentally important. As the economy moves to be ever more service-oriented, we need to understand and shape what will be needed for stability. Not just of the services themselves but for the ecosystem that the services depend upon.

 

The context recognition that is the foundation for automation of knowledge work actually requires stability to function. If the system is chaotic, context becomes very rare. Having a viable research agenda is not nearly as altruistic as it first seems.

Bring Your Own Service – two years later…

BYOS.pngA couple of years ago I wrote about how bring your own service was part of the future we’ll need to understand. I just saw that Gartner put out a release saying that personal cloud will replace the personal computer as the center of user’s lives by 2014.

 

We’ve probably all seen how the specifics of the device are less important for the people (let alone organization) to worry about. A good example of this trend I came across recently is Aereo.

 

I was looking at Aereo as part of my personal cloud, enabling me to capture television broadcasts and watch them on almost every device (except it still didn’t work with my Xbox One) as long as I am within the stations coverage area. This kind of a centrally available approach to a leveraged TV service is likely to be disruptive.

 

The diversity of services being offered is expanding and based on the meeting I attended last week with the NSF talking about service innovation research, there are a number of industries that are going to be disrupted by this more service-oriented view of the world. Questions remain though about the risks and quality expectations as well as how to communicate the changes to all the affected parties.

Education and automation

 

education2.pngRecently, Jim Spohrer created a blog post stating: Most careers in the era of cognitive systems have not been invented yet. There are so many people concerned about the automation of knowledge worker roles, but we’ve not yet seen the new roles that will develop.

 

The role of education definitely needs to shift to making students more self-sufficient when it comes to learning, planting the seed for life-long learning. As I heard it stated recently “Education is preparation for an interview that has yet to be scheduled.” This week my son started a new job, teaching virtually down in Florida. This state is definitely serious about  students understanding the new options in education.

 

The value and needs of next generation services that take advantage of social collaboration, IoT, analytics and automation are only now beginning to be understood. Once we get a grasp on them, things will shift once again, at the tasks are understood and become mundane (and targets for further automation). We’re all going to need to be flexible – in our processes as well as ourselves.

 

The next few weeks are going to be pretty busy

working.pngThere is a tweet chat tomorrow that I’ll try to sit in on at Noon Central titled: Should CIOs care about the Internet of Things? Use #CIOchat, to see the interaction.

 

I have the Future of Service Innovation Conference next week where I’ll be giving the closing remarks on a Service Futures Call to Action.

 

We have HPs global technical conference in early April and an NSF sponsored services research session in Washington DC coming up the 2nd week of April.

 

It is clear that there is a great deal of focus on the changing world of Services and IT. Hopefully that will give me some more things to think and post about here.

 

And of course, I still have my real job to do too – when you’re a mobile worker you just get it done wherever you can.

Context recognition as a service

gossip.pngI was in a discussion the other day as part of the ISSIP Service Futures meeting where we were discussing context-based computing and its impact on services. One of the concepts that fell out of that discussion was the need for ‘context flow’. This might be a new type (or at least a new use) of middleware to share a common understanding of the context of the user or the application portfolio.

 

Why should all the applications have their own context recognition capabilities? Couldn’t they rely on a common engine for at least a basic understanding of what is going on?? Answering questions like:

  • Where is the user? And why?
  • Is this a busy day?
  • Are they traveling?

Applications could subscribe to this contextual advisor function and change their behavior – treating the user in custom ways to fit the situation they are currently in. I can see all kinds of gamification and augmented reality implications.

 

There could be a standard range of contextual states that the entire environment could take advantage of. Maybe this already exists, but I’ve not seen it.

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About the Author(s)
  • Steve Simske is an HP Fellow and Director in the Printing and Content Delivery Lab in Hewlett-Packard Labs, and is the Director and Chief Technologist for the HP Labs Security Printing and Imaging program.
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