The Next Big Thing
Posts about next generation technologies and their effect on business.

The great wall of Social Awareness

Earlier this month, NASCAR debuted the NASCAR Social Wall Powered by HP at the Iowa Speedway. The event marked the first time the 6.5-by-28-foot social media visualization wall extending the previous social dashboarding efforts to the track itself. There was also this article about the NASCAR Social Wall Powered by HP.

 

To see how they build it, look at the following video:

 

It makes me wonder about other events we'll start seeing this same kind of capability. If you've ever seen the giant screen at the Texas Motor Speedway, you could use a small corner for this kind of information all time time.

Tags: Social| Trends
Labels: Social| Trends

Digital Business, recycling buzzwords

digitization.jpgI don’t know about you but the recent flourish of discussion related to Digital Business makes me feel like I am back in the ‘90s. McKinsey is tracking What’s trending in #digital. Saugatuck is posting on digital business and the key challenges.

 

It really makes me wish for a new set of verbiage… maybe cognitive computing can get us beyond just 1’s and 0’s, since the world is really analog.

A perspective of the WWW at 25

25.pngI didn’t have much time for a post today, but I saw this post last week titled: What Will Digital Life Be Like in 2025? that was worth mentioning.

 

It was Irving’s perspective on a few Pew Research Center  assessments about the 25th anniversary of the WWW. There was also a perspective on the future implications focused on how the IoT will drift into the background.

 

Overall a positive perspective on the future.

 

When I think about other anniversaries this year

Will there be a new dimension to UI design based on cognitive computing?

things.jpgI recently read a report on How Humans Respond to Robots that focused on the social side of robotics. Near the end of the article it started to talk about autonomous cars, autopilots and other devices that are really robots but we don’t normally think of them that way (e.g., smart thermostats) because of their minimal user interface.

 

In a world where we’ll soon have wearable technologies all around us, likely building to a $50 billion market by 2017, pumping out data to feed the autonomous response of cognitive computing, it does make me wonder how enterprise architectures and application portfolios will drive us into the uncanny valley for business automation.

 

As we automate things and find patterns, the automated response could be a bit eerie and unsettling. Likely a new dimension for User Interface Designers of the future will look beyond just the traditional capabilities and more deeply into user intent and the sense of user interactions – so we can accept the assistance as intended.

Is it time for a Chief Automation Officer?

Automation officer.pngOver the last few years, there has been quite a bit of discussion about the race against the machines (or the race with the machines), based on the abundance of computing available. When I think about the IoT and its implications on business, it may be that information is just a side effect of an entirely different corporate strategic effort.

 

Maybe there is a need for a Chief Automation Officer more than a Chief Information Officer going forward?!? Someone who looks at the business implications and opportunities for cognitive computing, sensing, robotics and other automation techniques.

 

Or is automation just assumed to be part of all future strategic planning activities. As I began thinking about it, it’s clear that others have thought about this CAO role as well, although mostly from an IT perspective instead of one based on business need. It could be viewed that this is a role for the CTO or even the enterprise architect.

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About the Author(s)
  • Steve Simske is an HP Fellow and Director in the Printing and Content Delivery Lab in Hewlett-Packard Labs, and is the Director and Chief Technologist for the HP Labs Security Printing and Imaging program.
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