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A bright new day for the network (and a quick way to learn about it)

By Yanick Pouffary, Chief Technologist, Technology Services Networking

 

Yanick Pouffary.pngWith Interop Las Vegas 2013 fast approaching, let me describe our new highly interactive HP Connectivity Transformation Experience Workshop. This workshop focuses on helping companies to understand the pragmatic transformation they need to undertake to go from current legacy network environment to the future network environment that’s agile and aligned with their business goals. (You can read about the workshop in our recent press release and this service brief.)

 

Remember how ten years ago, turning a service request around in one month was totally acceptable? By contrast, today’s network owners are expected to turn around service requests in under an hour. And while other major IT domains such as compute and store have come further in having the technology ability to be responsive to the business, the network is seen as the laggard.

 

And it’s a fact. Current networks simply can no longer keep up and meet the exponential demands caused by trends such as cloud, big data, social media, and the consumerization of IT.

 

Enterprise networks today are challenged, to say the least. They have a hard time meeting the speed, agility and changing demands of the business, users and devices.

 

I travel the world talking to customers, and it’s clear that today’s networks are over-provisioned and underutilized, and management now knows it. So when compared to other IT domains like server utilization, the network is seen as an expensive user of CAPEX and OPEX resources. Network designs are aged and inflexible. And requests are often met by duplicating or expanding that inflexible environment. This implies that these networks are also highly complex. So even the last bastion of network bragging rights is at risk – the network is no longer seen as reliable.

 

But it is not the fault of the network manager! The ability to respond to the business has been stymied by the technology options available! I hope you agree with me.

 

Can you imagine a future state where you can respond to business needs exactly when they arise, and you can never again be accused of over-provisioning? Technology NOW allows us to do this!

 

In this new world, demand still remains elastic and growing because of the continued consumerization of IT; however, supply is now fully elastic and able to respond to the demands of the business – at the speed of business. AND this combined demand and supply equilibrium elevates the overall responsiveness of the enterprise.

 

Finally, let’s keep in mind a couple of points that a transformation agenda in enterprise networks should consider:

 

  • The changing face of demand: the user is not just the “application” team asking for network services anymore!
  • The need for an agile network: you’ll want to build a network that can scale up and scale down as required by the business.

If you’re planning to attend Interop and you’d like to understand these technology options, stop by the HP booth and ask for me!

 

And if you can't make it to Interop, don't worry; we'll be running our one-hour mini-workshop at HP Discover 2013 in Las Vegas, too. Join us there!

 

For more about the HP Connectivity Transformation Experience Workshop, take a look at Brian Quah's blog Transforming Traditional Networks into SDN Networks

 

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